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IPMnet NEWS


April 1995, Issue no. 17
ISSN: 1523-7893 Copyright 2005


Quick Nav: News | Medley | Research/Papers | Centers | U.S. Aid | Calendar |  
 

IPM NEWS --- international IPM news and programs

I. IPM NEWS / APPLICATIONS international IPM news, and application of IPM techniques and programs. Nationwide Initiative Begins To Boost IPM Across U.S. The Clinton Administration's widely heralded IPM initiative launched in 1994 has now redirected and combined programs to meet the challenge of helping achieve a national goal of IPM usage on 75 percent of cropped acres by the year 2000. The charge given the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) was to increase the knowledge of IPM, improve delivery of technical expertise, and ultimately increase IPM implementation nationwide. USDA has the lead in the IPM initiative and has committed personnel and resources to the task.

The Initiative is structured to heavily involve agricultural producers, as well as researchers and extensionists working through land grant universities. The IPM Development and Implementation Program, dubbed a public-private sector partnership, seeks to coordinate IPM-related efforts of eight USDA agencies and is supported by increases in several proposed budgets. these include:

An Extension education program to accelerate activation and use of IPM strategies by all involved with pest management, speed up technology transfer, and assist the private sector in developing and improving delivery of pest management services carries a proposed US million budget.

Special Research Grants for IPM and Biological Control is proposed at US million.

A new competitive grants program to develop alternatives to pesticides for a variety of reasons has proposed support of US.5 million.

In addition to USDA, IPM efforts will be coordinated with several other U.S. federal entities including the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Agency. For more information, contact either: L. Elworth, USDA, phone 01-202-720-5166; or M.S. Fitzner, CREES/USDA, phone 01-202-401-4781. U.S. National IPM Coordinators Meet U.S. State IPM Coordinators were invited to a two-day National IPM Coordinators Workshop in Washington, DC, during March to participate in a series of presentations, panels, and open discussions in conjunction with coordinating early phases of the nationwide U.S. IPM Initiative. Representatives from several agencies within the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, as well as other cooperating agencies, explained their group's roles and resources for supporting the Initiative and for helping to encourage IPM implementation at the state and local levels.

Provocative presentations ranged from "The Death and Resurrection of IPM," to "New Congress, New Challenges," invoking state IPM coordinators to consider methods for implementation in their locality. A key panel took up the challenging topic of "Strategies for Increasing Public Awareness of IPM." The newly formed National IPM Network was introduced and its resources described.

Transgenic Plants Combat Parasites Scientists recently reported that several crop plants have been genetically modified to withstand the application of herbicides used to control two of the most pernicious parastitic weed species. Parasitic broomrape [Orobanche spp.] and witchweed [_Strigaspp.] attack a crop plant's roots, but flower only after the major damage is done. Thus, herbicides applied to these parasitic plants, once they appear, have very little impact. In the reported tests conducted in Israel, a single herbicide application to the crop resulted in 95 percent normal growth and flowering in the transgenic host, while controlling parasitic weeds and thereby boosting yield, the researchers reported.

Working with the U.S. Agency for International Development and several herbicide producers, the research team found three plants with genetic target-site resistanceone of two popular genetic modificationsthat resisted the effects of herbicide. A quick review of costs indicated that yield gain realized by controlling the parasitic weeds more than offsets the added cost of both the transgenic seed and the small amount of herbicide needed. For more information, contact: D. Joel, Dept. of Weed Research, Regional Experiment Station, Newe-Ya'ar 31999, Israel.

IPM Brings Benefits to New York To most of the world, the term "New York" conjures up skyscrapers, traffic, and a fast-paced urban life with all its attendant problems. Thus, it may come as a surprise to learn that agriculture is among New York State's (NYS) major industries. That fact is a major impetus behind the state's dedicated support for conducting one of the world's most active IPM programs. A recently released fact sheet from the NYS IPM Program Office reviews some of the environmental and economic benefits attributed to the NYS IPM effort:

The IPM program has reduced farm production costs by US$ 14 million. It has helped decrease the number of pesticide applications statewide, the volume of pesticide used, and the ensuing impact on the environment. The NYS IPM program has been involved with development of 25 new products such as: beetle excluders, weather monitors, brush hoes, pest forecasting software, electrostatic sprayers, pheromone twist-ties, insect trapping devices, and weed burners, in addition to pest-resistant varieties of apples and potatoes. It has helped to develop three new small businesses and enhanced the financial climate for six others; In cooperation with the private sector, IPM has helped create or encourage development of more than 100 new jobs;

For more information, contact: NYS IPM Office, Phone: 01-800-635-8356. Shift Seen for Ectoparasites IPM According to R.A. Bram, a U.S. federal research scientist concerned with veterinary medicine and animal health, integrated control of ectoparasites with veterinary importance is being implemented on a limited basis at present. However, several forces are working to accelerate a global shift to IPM. In a paper, "Integrated Control of Ectoparasites," Bram lists these forces as:

reduction in new chemical compounds registered for use on livestock and poultry; universal development of resistance to pesticides; heightened environmental sensitivities to exclusive dependence on pesticide-based control; and, need for strategies which increase profits for the producer while decreasing costs to the consumer.

Bram notes that integrated pest control requires many technologies for incorporation into specific pest management systems. Individual components include new chemicals, formulations and delivery systems, biological control, mechanical control, immunological control, genetic control, and regulatory control. Computer simulation models based on a quantitative ecological database are invaluable in devising and monitoring IPM approaches to controlling ectoparasites which affect livestock and poultry. IPM strategies have been developed for pests of veterinary importance, but eventually these must be incorporated into total livestock production systems.

For implementation, a number of major impediments to IPM must be overcome, Bram observes. These problems can best be solved through a vigorous technology transfer program. In addition to face-to-face meetings between producers and extension agents, the implementation of IPM can be further encouraged at producer group meetings, through education of animal health professionals, by the publication of articles in producer magazines, and by radio and television broadcasts to the agricultural sector. Research focusing on the development of cost-effective and environmentally-compatible IPM systems is necessary for future progress.

excerpted from: REV. SCIEN. ET TECH. DE L'OFF. INTL. DES EPI., 13(4), 1357-1365, December 1994.

Using IPM to Clip and Save IPM offers an opportunity to reduce lawn care costs without sacrificing quality or esthetic beauty, according to a "Common Sense Methods of Managing Pests" fact sheet jointly published by the Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture and the (former) U.S. Soil Conservation Service. INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT TIPS FOR LAWNS recommends soil testing as being basic to management. Based on test results, adding lime may be beneficial to adjust pH levels. If the soil is severely acidic (low pH) requiring heavy liming, split the recommended application 50-50 spring and fall.

The fact sheet also advocates paying attention to "good mowing practices," such as:

Sharp mower blades cut grass cleanly. Dull blades leave grass ragged and more susceptible to disease. Mowing height should be set at 2.5-3 inches (6.5-7.5 cm) and kept at that setting all season. Taller grass resists drought longer and shades out weeds. Mow according to grass height, not by day of the week. Time mowing to remove one-third or less of the grass blade at a pass. Mow late in the day to avoid periods of high photosynthesis. Avoid mowing when grass is wet and does not cut cleanly (and clogs mowers).

The fact sheet also presents useful tips for mulching and clipping management. For more information, contact: Bureau of Plant Industry, Penn. Dept. of Agriculture, 2301 N. Cameron St., Harrisburg, PA 17110-9408, USA. Dyeing Flies A combination of commercially available dyes may have potential as an insecticide, according to research being conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) where scientists found that, with addition of a little light, the dye mixture is lethal to fruit flies. Certain red and yellow dyes are already mixed and commercially marketed as SureDye, which is used in cosmetics and medicines. SureDye is a combination of D&C Red No. 28 and D&C Yellow No. 8, both of which are registered with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

In recent tests, Mediterranean and Mexican fruit flies [Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), and Anastrepha ludens (Loew)] that ingested the dye were dead soon after being exposed to light. Scientists speculate that the red dye reacts with light and is transformed into a substance that destroys the insects' digestive tracts. The yellow dye is believed to increase the activity of the red dye.

If further testing proves that the technique is successful, safe, and economic, SureDye could become an alternative to malathion, currently the main insecticide used to control fruit flies. For more information, contact: USDA-ARS Crop Quality and Fruit Insects Research Unit, 2301 S. International Blvd., Weslaco, TX 78596, USA. Phone: 01-210-565-2647. Fax: 01-210-565-6652.

excerpted from AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH, February 1995.





SPECIAL NOTICE IPMnet is now linked to the National (U.S.) IPM Network, a group of government, education, and other organizations dedicated to development and implementation of integrated pest management. As a result of this linkage, the IPMnet NEWS now can be accessed on the National IPM Network's World Wide Web system.

The address is: URL - ipmwww.ncsu.edu specific address for the IPMnet NEWS is: ipmwww.ncsu.edu
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IPM MEDLEY --- publications and other IPM information resources

April 1995, Issue no. 17 ISSN: 1523-7893 Copyright 2005

The Integrated Plant Protection Center (IPPC) produces and provides IPMnet NEWS as a free, electronic, global, IPM Information resource



Current Issue

CONTENTS I. IPM News / Applications II. Forum / Editorial III. Research Roundup IV. Calendar V. IPM Medley, including Publications



I. IPM NEWS / APPLICATIONS international IPM news, and application of IPM techniques and programs. Nationwide Initiative Begins To Boost IPM Across U.S. The Clinton Administration's widely heralded IPM initiative launched in 1994 has now redirected and combined programs to meet the challenge of helping achieve a national goal of IPM usage on 75 percent of cropped acres by the year 2000. The charge given the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) was to increase the knowledge of IPM, improve delivery of technical expertise, and ultimately increase IPM implementation nationwide. USDA has the lead in the IPM initiative and has committed personnel and resources to the task.

The Initiative is structured to heavily involve agricultural producers, as well as researchers and extensionists working through land grant universities. The IPM Development and Implementation Program, dubbed a public-private sector partnership, seeks to coordinate IPM-related efforts of eight USDA agencies and is supported by increases in several proposed budgets. these include:

An Extension education program to accelerate activation and use of IPM strategies by all involved with pest management, speed up technology transfer, and assist the private sector in developing and improving delivery of pest management services carries a proposed US million budget.

Special Research Grants for IPM and Biological Control is proposed at US million.

A new competitive grants program to develop alternatives to pesticides for a variety of reasons has proposed support of US.5 million.

In addition to USDA, IPM efforts will be coordinated with several other U.S. federal entities including the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Agency. For more information, contact either: L. Elworth, USDA, phone 01-202-720-5166; or M.S. Fitzner, CREES/USDA, phone 01-202-401-4781. U.S. National IPM Coordinators Meet U.S. State IPM Coordinators were invited to a two-day National IPM Coordinators Workshop in Washington, DC, during March to participate in a series of presentations, panels, and open discussions in conjunction with coordinating early phases of the nationwide U.S. IPM Initiative. Representatives from several agencies within the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, as well as other cooperating agencies, explained their group's roles and resources for supporting the Initiative and for helping to encourage IPM implementation at the state and local levels.

Provocative presentations ranged from "The Death and Resurrection of IPM," to "New Congress, New Challenges," invoking state IPM coordinators to consider methods for implementation in their locality. A key panel took up the challenging topic of "Strategies for Increasing Public Awareness of IPM." The newly formed National IPM Network was introduced and its resources described.

Transgenic Plants Combat Parasites Scientists recently reported that several crop plants have been genetically modified to withstand the application of herbicides used to control two of the most pernicious parastitic weed species. Parasitic broomrape [Orobanche spp.] and witchweed [_Strigaspp.] attack a crop plant's roots, but flower only after the major damage is done. Thus, herbicides applied to these parasitic plants, once they appear, have very little impact. In the reported tests conducted in Israel, a single herbicide application to the crop resulted in 95 percent normal growth and flowering in the transgenic host, while controlling parasitic weeds and thereby boosting yield, the researchers reported.

Working with the U.S. Agency for International Development and several herbicide producers, the research team found three plants with genetic target-site resistanceone of two popular genetic modificationsthat resisted the effects of herbicide. A quick review of costs indicated that yield gain realized by controlling the parasitic weeds more than offsets the added cost of both the transgenic seed and the small amount of herbicide needed. For more information, contact: D. Joel, Dept. of Weed Research, Regional Experiment Station, Newe-Ya'ar 31999, Israel.

IPM Brings Benefits to New York To most of the world, the term "New York" conjures up skyscrapers, traffic, and a fast-paced urban life with all its attendant problems. Thus, it may come as a surprise to learn that agriculture is among New York State's (NYS) major industries. That fact is a major impetus behind the state's dedicated support for conducting one of the world's most active IPM programs. A recently released fact sheet from the NYS IPM Program Office reviews some of the environmental and economic benefits attributed to the NYS IPM effort:

The IPM program has reduced farm production costs by US$ 14 million. It has helped decrease the number of pesticide applications statewide, the volume of pesticide used, and the ensuing impact on the environment. The NYS IPM program has been involved with development of 25 new products such as: beetle excluders, weather monitors, brush hoes, pest forecasting software, electrostatic sprayers, pheromone twist-ties, insect trapping devices, and weed burners, in addition to pest-resistant varieties of apples and potatoes. It has helped to develop three new small businesses and enhanced the financial climate for six others; In cooperation with the private sector, IPM has helped create or encourage development of more than 100 new jobs;

For more information, contact: NYS IPM Office, Phone: 01-800-635-8356. Shift Seen for Ectoparasites IPM According to R.A. Bram, a U.S. federal research scientist concerned with veterinary medicine and animal health, integrated control of ectoparasites with veterinary importance is being implemented on a limited basis at present. However, several forces are working to accelerate a global shift to IPM. In a paper, "Integrated Control of Ectoparasites," Bram lists these forces as:

reduction in new chemical compounds registered for use on livestock and poultry; universal development of resistance to pesticides; heightened environmental sensitivities to exclusive dependence on pesticide-based control; and, need for strategies which increase profits for the producer while decreasing costs to the consumer.

Bram notes that integrated pest control requires many technologies for incorporation into specific pest management systems. Individual components include new chemicals, formulations and delivery systems, biological control, mechanical control, immunological control, genetic control, and regulatory control. Computer simulation models based on a quantitative ecological database are invaluable in devising and monitoring IPM approaches to controlling ectoparasites which affect livestock and poultry. IPM strategies have been developed for pests of veterinary importance, but eventually these must be incorporated into total livestock production systems.

For implementation, a number of major impediments to IPM must be overcome, Bram observes. These problems can best be solved through a vigorous technology transfer program. In addition to face-to-face meetings between producers and extension agents, the implementation of IPM can be further encouraged at producer group meetings, through education of animal health professionals, by the publication of articles in producer magazines, and by radio and television broadcasts to the agricultural sector. Research focusing on the development of cost-effective and environmentally-compatible IPM systems is necessary for future progress.

excerpted from: REV. SCIEN. ET TECH. DE L'OFF. INTL. DES EPI., 13(4), 1357-1365, December 1994.

Using IPM to Clip and Save IPM offers an opportunity to reduce lawn care costs without sacrificing quality or esthetic beauty, according to a "Common Sense Methods of Managing Pests" fact sheet jointly published by the Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture and the (former) U.S. Soil Conservation Service. INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT TIPS FOR LAWNS recommends soil testing as being basic to management. Based on test results, adding lime may be beneficial to adjust pH levels. If the soil is severely acidic (low pH) requiring heavy liming, split the recommended application 50-50 spring and fall.

The fact sheet also advocates paying attention to "good mowing practices," such as:

Sharp mower blades cut grass cleanly. Dull blades leave grass ragged and more susceptible to disease. Mowing height should be set at 2.5-3 inches (6.5-7.5 cm) and kept at that setting all season. Taller grass resists drought longer and shades out weeds. Mow according to grass height, not by day of the week. Time mowing to remove one-third or less of the grass blade at a pass. Mow late in the day to avoid periods of high photosynthesis. Avoid mowing when grass is wet and does not cut cleanly (and clogs mowers).

The fact sheet also presents useful tips for mulching and clipping management. For more information, contact: Bureau of Plant Industry, Penn. Dept. of Agriculture, 2301 N. Cameron St., Harrisburg, PA 17110-9408, USA. Dyeing Flies A combination of commercially available dyes may have potential as an insecticide, according to research being conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) where scientists found that, with addition of a little light, the dye mixture is lethal to fruit flies. Certain red and yellow dyes are already mixed and commercially marketed as SureDye, which is used in cosmetics and medicines. SureDye is a combination of D&C Red No. 28 and D&C Yellow No. 8, both of which are registered with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

In recent tests, Mediterranean and Mexican fruit flies [Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), and Anastrepha ludens (Loew)] that ingested the dye were dead soon after being exposed to light. Scientists speculate that the red dye reacts with light and is transformed into a substance that destroys the insects' digestive tracts. The yellow dye is believed to increase the activity of the red dye.

If further testing proves that the technique is successful, safe, and economic, SureDye could become an alternative to malathion, currently the main insecticide used to control fruit flies. For more information, contact: USDA-ARS Crop Quality and Fruit Insects Research Unit, 2301 S. International Blvd., Weslaco, TX 78596, USA. Phone: 01-210-565-2647. Fax: 01-210-565-6652.

excerpted from AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH, February 1995.





SPECIAL NOTICE IPMnet is now linked to the National (U.S.) IPM Network, a group of government, education, and other organizations dedicated to development and implementation of integrated pest management. As a result of this linkage, the IPMnet NEWS now can be accessed on the National IPM Network's World Wide Web system.

The address is: URL - ipmwww.ncsu.edu specific address for the IPMnet NEWS is: ipmwww.ncsu.edu



II. FORUM / EDITORIAL viewpoints, opinions, and open discussion of IPM issues. Oregon State Univ. entomologist M. Kogan was an invited speaker at the XVth CONGRESS OF THE BRAZILIAN ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY held in the mountain resort town of Caxambu (pro- nounced "Ca-cham-booh"), in the State of Minas Gerais, about 230 mi southeast of Rio, during 12-16 March. Here are excerpts from Dr. Kogan's notes. The Brazilian Society meets every other year, and the meetings, designated a National Congress, are a major scientific event, well covered by the local news media. The Brazilian Society probably is second only to the Entomological Society of America in number of members. Congress registration reached about 1,200, with significant participation of both undergraduate and graduate students representing every major university in the country. These enthusiastic young people often travel long distances by bus to get to the Congress venue. The atmosphere at the Congress is that of a gala event. The daily schedule begins with three or four concurrent major se sions with topics ranging from the very specific, e.g. in 1995, "The Use of Chrysopidae in Biological Control," by C.F. Carvalho, to the rather broad "Recent advances in IPM," that I was asked to cover. There followed multiple concurrent sessions of submitted papers as well as gatherings that are part of organized conferences running simultaneously with the Congress.

For 1995, the two conferences were the II SYMPOSIUM ON INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT, and the VI NATIONAL MEETING OF PHYTOSANITARISTS, an organization that deals with issues of quarantine and regulations related to movement of biological materials (akin to APHIS in the USA).

Besides experiencing a well organized Congress program, participants received a hefty volume packed with the 790 abstracts of presented papers and posters.

One of the strikingly unique features of these meetings is the ubiquitous presence and involvement of agrochemical companies who provide substantial advance financial support and have a strong presence (with an active logistical supporting staff onsite) during the Congress. The business stands are not only attractive and well stocked with technical literature, after 4:00pm they double as hospitality suites and treat visitors to appetizers and drinks, which makes their display areas extremely popular. Interestingly enough, the relationship of (public sector) scientists with agribusiness does not seem to compromise the independence and integrity of the information exchange process.

IPM is the overwhelming focus of these meetings and industry is capitalizing on it by promoting products that have reputedly performed well in selectivity tests. For example, one company offering a new product for aphid control had a display of live natural enemies: parasitic wasps, carabids, and predaceous pentatomids on soybean plants treated with the new compound. It is apparent that Brazilian entomologists and some of the major agrochemical companies have reached a level of mutual understanding and respect that has been beneficial to both the industry and the public sector. Interestingly, IPM is the common denominator.

- M. Kogan

" Quotes " "IPM can be thought of as a continuum, with one end largely consisting of chemical inputs and minimal time spent in pest management. Along the continuum, growers add tactics such as crop rotation, biological controls, resistant varieties of plants, pheromones (sex hormones) to attract insects, better timing of sprays, and other non-chemical methods. Eventually, they reach the endpoint where they've minimized their use of chemicals, but have increased the amount of time and management skills devoted to their operations." "Pesticides have a place in producing crops, and it's not necessary to eliminate them completely. However, with IPM the farmer uses them more judiciously....... With IPM, growers substitute more information, more intensive management, and more in-field work for pesticides."

A.A. Sorenson, American Farmland Trust (from, FOOD INSIGHT REPORTS, May/June 1993) High on the list of research and technology advances sought by apple growers in the State of New York is the: "Introduction of pest and disease resistance through bio- technology and other available means to further reduce the need for pesticides."

M.V. Durando, Western New York (USA) Apple Growers Association



III. RESEARCH ROUNDUP research and findings that have an impact on IPM. Integrated Controls for Canegrub In Australia, 19 species of scarab larvae, collectively known as canegrubs, are known to attack sugarcane root systems. Thousands of hectares of sugarcane were damaged before the introduction of organochlorine insecticides in 1948. A controlled-release formulation of chlorpyrifos (suSCon Blue) and a non-residual formulation of ethoprophos (Mocap) replaced the organochlorines in the 1980s. However, recent failures of both these products in some areas intensified the search for alternative controls.

L.N. Robertson and colleagues, writing in the AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH, 46(1), 1995, review the current knowledge of canegrub biology, ecology, and control in Australia. "Integrated Management of Canegrubs in Australia: Current Situation and Future Research Directions," presents an outline of research required to develop sustainable pest management for this pest. Knowledge of the population dynamics of canegrubs, the authors suggest, will be integrated with cultural, chemical, and biological controls as appropriate for each pest in each region. A decision-support system will help pest managers make appropriate choices for management action.

excerpted from: CURR. CONT. Ag, Bio. & Env. Sci., 26(10), March 1995.

Noted Research Papers "Control of Oriental Fruit Moth by Mating Disruption Using Sex Pheromones in the Niagara Peninsula, Ontario," Free, D.J. et al. CAN. ENTOMOLOGIST, 126(6), 1287-1300, November- December 1994. "Cost Efficient Pesticide Reductions: A Study of Sweden," Gren, I-M. ENVIRON. AND RESOURCE ECON., 4, 279-293, 1994.

"Cross Protection Against Virus Diseases in Fruit Trees," Alrefai, R.H., and S.S. Korban. FRUIT VAR. JRNL., 49(1), 21-30, January 1995.

"Effects of Different Integrated Pest Management Programs on Biological Control of Mites on Apple by Predatory Mites (Acari) in Nova-Scotia," Hardman, J.M., R.F. Smith, and E. Bent. ENVIRON. ENT., 24(1), 125-142, February 1995.

"Effects of Intercropping and Fertilizer Application on Weed Control and Performance of Cassava and Maize," Olasan- tan, F.O., E.O. Lucas, and H.C. Ezumah. FIELD CROPS RES., 39(2-3), 63-70, December 1994.

"Effects of Intercropping White Cabbage with Clovers on Pest Infestation and Yield," Theunissen, J, C.J.H. Booij, and L.A.P. Lotz. ENTOMOLOGIA EXPERI. ET APPLICATA, 74(1), 7-16, January 1995.

"Energy Analysis of Tillage and Herbicide Inputs in Alternative Weed Management Systems," Clements, D.R. et al. AGRIC., ECOSYSTEMS & ENVIRON., 52(2-3), 119-128, February 1995.

"Importation, Releases, and Establishment of Neochetina spp (Col: Curculionidae) for the Biological Control of Water Hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes (lil: Pontederiaceae), in Benin, West Africa," VanThielen, R., et al. ENTOMOPHAGA, 39(2), 1994.

"Inheritance of Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis CryIIIA o-endotoxin in Colorado Potato Beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), Rahardja, U., and M.E. Whalon. JRNL. ECON. ENTO., 88(1), 21-26, February 1995.

"Integrated Pest Management and Conservation Behaviors," Glynn, C.J., D.G. Mcdonald, and J.P. Tette. JRNL. OF SOIL AND WATER CONSERV., 50(1), 25-29, January-February 1995.

"Localized Failure of a Weed Biological Control Agent Attributed to Insecticide Drift," Hoffman, J.H., and V.C. Moran. AGRIC., ECOSYSTEMS & ENVIRON., 52(2-3), 197-204, February 1995.

"Management of Helicoverpa-Armigera (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) on Chickpea in Southern India - Thresholds and the Economics of Host Plant Resistance and Insecticide Application," Wightman, J.A., et al. CROP PROT., 14(1), 37-46, February 1995.

"Nozzle Selection for Optimizing Deposition and Minimizing Spray Drift for the AT-502 Air Tractor," Brouse, L.F., et al. TRANS. OF THE ASAE, 37(6), 1725-1732, November-December 1994.

"Reduction of Douglas Fir Beetle Infestation of High-risk Stands by Antiaggregation and Aggregation Pheromones," Ross, D.W., and G.E. Daterman. CAN. JRNL. OF FOR. RESCH., 24(11), 2184-2190, November 1994.

"Spring Migration, Reproductive Behavior, Monitoring Procedures, and Host Preference of Plum Curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Prunus Species in Central Georgia," Yonce, C.E., D.L. Horton, and W.E. Okie. JRNL. OF ENTO. SCI., 30(1), 82-92, January 1995.

"The Value of Information in Herbicide Decision Making for Weed Control in Australian Wheat Crops," Pannell, D.J. JRNL OF AGRIC. AND RES. ECON., 19(2), 366-381, December 1994.





NOTE: Can't locate a journal? Contact IPMnet NEWS. We may be able to provide the needed information.





IV. CALENDAR future events: meetings, seminars, conferences, and training courses that relate to global IPM. NOTE: sponsors and organizers are cordially encouraged to send information about future events to:

IPMnet NEWS, c/o Integrated Plant Protection Center 2040 Cordley Hall, Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331-2915, USA. Fax: 01-503-373-3080 E-mail: deutscha@bcc.orst.edu # = new entry since the last issue of IPMnet NEWS. {+} = additional information. or changes.



1995 24 April-19 May BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF ARTHROPOD PESTS & WEEDS, Ascot, U.K. A joint International Institute of Biological Control/Imperial College course for agricultural and crop pro- tection researchers, extensionists, field trainers in farming, forestry and conservation NGOs. Contact: S. Williamson, IIBC, Silwood Pk., Ascot, Berks. SL5 7TA, U.K. Phone: 44-0344-872999. Fax: 44-0344-875007. E-mail: cabi-iibc@cabi.org. 9 May 47th INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON CROP PROTECTION, Univ. of Gent, BELGIUM. Contact: L. Tirry, Fac. of Agric. and Applied Bio. Sciences, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Gent, BELGIUM. Phone: 32-9-264-6152. Fax: 32-9-264-6239.

14-20 May 11th TRIENNIAL SYMPOSIUM ON FUNGICIDES, Reinhards- brunn, GERMANY. Contact: P. Russel, AgrEvo UK, Chesterford Park, Saffron Walden CB10 1XL, U.K.

26-29 June 3rd INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON POPULATION DYNAMICS OF PLANT INHABITING MITES, DENMARK. For a preliminary pro- gram and other detailed information, contact: G. Nachman, Zoological Institute, Dept. of Population Biology, Univ. of Copenhagen, 15 Universitetsparken, DK 2100 Copenhagen O, DENMARK. Fax: 45 35 32 13 00. E-mail: gnachman@zi.ku.dk.

2-7 July XIII INTERNATIONAL PLANT PROTECTION CONGRESS, "Sus- tainable Crop Protection for the Benefit of All," The Hague, The NETHERLANDS. Includes an IPM symposium. Contact: J.C. Zadoks, Organizer XIII IPPC, c/o Holland Organizing Centre, Parkstraat 29, 2514 JD The Hague, THE NETHERLANDS. Phone: 31-70-365-7850. FAX: 31-70-361-4846.

3-7 July 10th CONGRESS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN AFRICA 1995, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, SOUTH AFRICA. The proposed program includes paper and poster sessions, work- shops, a photographic exhibition (of the "Big Twelve" insects), informal social functions, and a formal conference dinner. Con- tact: M.H. Villet, Department of Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes Univ., Grahamstown 6140, SOUTH AFRICA. Phone: 27 [0]461 318-527. Fax: 27 [0]461 24377. E-mail: zomv@hippo.ru.ac.za.

10-12 July 9TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON CHALLENGES FOR WEED SCIENCE IN A CHANGING EUROPE, Budapest, HUNGARY. Contact: L. Radics, Kerteszeti es Elelmiszeiripari Egyetem, Mezogazdasagi Termelesi Tanszek, Budapest, HUNGARY.

24-28 July 15th ASIAN-PACIFIC WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY CONFERENCE, Dai-ichi Hotel, Tsukuba Science City, JAPAN. Contact: K. Usui, Institute of Applied Biochemistry, Univ. of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305, JAPAN. Phone: 81-298-53-4748. Fax: 81-298-53-4605.

# 3-5 August NATURAL ENEMIES OF WHITEFLIES: COLLECTION AND IDENTIFICATION, International Institute of Entomology Short Course, London, UK. Contact: Training Officer, IIE, 56 Queen's Gate, London SW7 5JR, UK. Phone: 44-171-584-0067. Fax: 44-171-581-1676. E-mail: d.agassiz@cabi.org.

6-10 August THIRD INTERNATIONAL CARIBBEAN CONFERENCE OF ENTOMOLOGY, Cariari Hotel, San Jose, COSTA RICA. Held in conjunction with the 78th Annual Meeting of the Florida Entomological Society. Contact: R. Mizell, IFAS, Univ. of Florida, Agricultural Research Center, Rt 4, Box 4092, Monticello, FL 32344, USA. Phone: 01-904-997-2596. Fax: 01-904-997-8178. E-mail: RFM@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu.

12-16 August AMERICAN PHYTOPATHOLOGICAL SOC. ANNUAL MEETING, D.L. Lawrence Convention Ctr., Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Contact: APS, 3340 Pilot Knob Road, St. Paul, MN 55121-2097, USA. Phone: 01-612-454-7250. Fax: 01-612-454-0766.

23-26 August SYSTEMATICS OF INVERTEBRATES AND MICROORGANISMS GLOBAL WORKSHOP, Cardiff, Wales, U.K. Contact: M.A. Cook, Technical Secretariat, BioNET-INTERNATIONAL, 56 Queen's Gate, London, SW7 5JR, U.K. Phone: 44-171-584 0067. Fax: 44-171-581-0067. E-mail: cabi-bionet@cabi.org.

28 August-2 September 9th SYMPOSIUM OF IOBC/WPRS ON INTEGRATED PLANT PROTECTION IN ORCHARDS/3rd SYMPOSIUM OF ISHS ON INTEGRATED FRUIT PRODUCTION, Cedzyna (near Kielce), POLAND. Contact: R.W. Olszak, Research Institute of Pomology and Floriculture, Pomologiczna 18, PL 96-100 Skierniewice, P.O. Box 105, POLAND. Phone: 48-40-2021. Fax: 48-40-3238. Conference language: English.

September/October 19th BIENNIAL SESSION OF THE ASIA AND PACIFIC PLANT PROTECTION COMMISSION, AUSTRALIA. Contact: APPC, Maliwan Mansion, Phra Atit Road, Bangkok 10200, THAILAND.

# 20-23 November BRIGHTON CONFERENCE, 1995, WEEDS, Brighton, U.K. Contact: CAS Ltd./BCPC, 4 Cavendish Square, London W1M 0BX, U.K. Phone: 44-0-1714-900-900. Fax: 44-0-1716-293-233.

1996 21-26 January 9th INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WEEDS. Contact: J.H. Hoffmann, Zoology Dept., Univ. of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700, SOUTH AFRICA. Fax: 27-21-650-3726. E-mail: hoff@botany.vct.ac.za. 6-9 February WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA, annual meeting, Marriot and Omni Hotels, Norfolk, VA, USA. Contact: WSSA, 1508 W. University Ave., Champaign, IL 61821, USA.

25-28 June INTERNATIONAL WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY, Copenhagen, DENMARK. Two concurrent sessions each day beginning with a keynote address on the session theme. Contact: ICS, PO Box 41, DK-2900 Hellerup, DENMARK; or IWSS, c/o IPPC, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-2915, USA. Phone: 01-503-737- 3541. Fax: 01-503-737-3080. E-mail: larsons@bcc.orst.edu.

# 2-5 July 3RD SYMPOSIUM OF THE EUROPEAN ASSOCIATION OF ACAROLOGISTS, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Theme: "Ecology and Evolution in the Acari." Emphasis will be given to phylogeny, evolutionary ecology, and population dynamics. Contact: T. Korzilius, Population Biology, Univ. of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 320, 1098 SM Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Fax: 31-20-525-7754. Phone: 31-20-525-7736. E-mail: korzilius@bio.uva.nl.

8-10 July INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INSECT PESTS IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT, Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh, U.K. Contact: W. Robinson, Urban Pest Control Resch. Ctr., Dept. of Entomology, VPI&SU, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0319, USA.

27-31 July AMERICAN PHYTOPATHOLOGICAL SOC. ANNUAL MEETING, Indianapolis, IN, USA. Contact: APS, 3340 Pilot Knob Road, St. Paul, MN 55121-2097, USA. Phone: 01-612-454-7250. Fax: 01-612-454-0766.

no date SIXTH INTERNATIONAL PARASITIC WEED SYMPOSIUM, Cordoba, SPAIN. Contact: M.T. Moreno, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Agrario, Apartado 4240, 14080 Cordoba, SPAIN. Fax: 34-57-202721.





V. IPM MEDLEY general IPM information, publications of interest, and other information resources. Society Adopts Far-reaching Resolution The 5,000-plus member American Phytopathological Society (APS) has adopted a seven-part World Population/Hunger resolution that affirms the Society's commitment to support research and education to control plant diseases and produce healthy plants that are in balance with the environment. The resolution, dated December 1994, pledges APS to join "colleagues of different nations and of different scientific disciplines to seek world solutions to global problems such as hunger, poverty, human population growth, and environmental degradation."

According to information released by the 77-year old Society, its members are particularly sensitive to the complex issues surrounding hunger, poverty, human suffering and environmental degradation, because of the historical role that plant diseases have played in causing famine and poverty.

For more information, contact: S.C. Nelson, APS, 2240 Pilot Knob Rd., St. Paul, MN 55121-2097, USA. Phone: 01-612-454-7250. Fax: 01-612-454-0766.

excerpted from: APS News Release, 15 March 1994.

Whitefly Biocontrol Course Set Whiteflies (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) are known worldwide as major pests of outdoor and glasshouse crops and ornamentals, in both temperate and tropical regions. Apart from directly damaging plants, this pest has been identified as an important vector of many plant diseases. To address the challenge, the UK-based International Institute of Entomology (IIE) is offering a short course, "Natural Enemies of Whiteflies: Collection and Identification," during 3-5 August 1995, at it's London, UK, facilities.

Within the broad range of insect plant pests, it is whiteflies which have often been the focus of successful biological pest control, using predators and particularly parasitic wasps. The IIE's intensive short course will help participants identify the families and genera of all whitefly natural enemies, with additional material provided about the identification of species currently used in biological control. Information on hosts, distribution, and relative economic importance will also be covered.

Course presenters A. Polaszek, G. Watson, and R. Booth are leading specialists in the systematics of whiteflies and their natural enemies, and collectively offer extensive experience with biological control and pest management in Europe, Africa, and Asia. For further information contact: D. Agassiz, Training Officer, IIE, 56 Queen's Gate, London SW7 5JR, UK. Fax: 44-171-581-1676. E-mail: d.agassiz@cabi.org. Phone: 44-171-584-0067.





Dr. James G. Horsfall, a leading plant pathologist and discoverer of organic fungicides, died on March 22 in Hamden, CT, USA, at the age of 90.





PUBLICATIONS AUTHORS AND PUBLISHERS

The IPMnet NEWS will gladly mention a publication provided it has a connection to IPM. To assure coverage, please send a review copy of the publication, with background information where to obtain copies, data about the author(s), costs, and any other particulars or materialsto: IPMnet NEWS, c/o Integrated Plant Protection Center 2040 Cordley Hall, Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331-2915, USA After review, materials will be cataloged into the Center's extensive international IPM and crop protection literature collection (which the worldwide IPM/crop protection community is welcome to use) or returned if so requested.





Recent Publications from ICRISAT The International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics has published several titles recently including:

Groundnut [Arachis hypogaea L.], a widely grown international crop, is attacked by bacterial wilt associated with the pathogen Pseudomonas solanacearum. At a meeting in Wuhan, China, during July 1994, participants from numerous countries presented papers concerning the problem in their country, along with recommendations for further collaborative research. These materials have been published as GROUNDUT BACTERIAL WILT IN ASIA, PROCEEDINGS OF THE THIRD WORKING GROUP MEETING, edited by V.K. Mehan and D. McDonald.

The latest addition to the ICRISAT Handbook Series is HANDBOOK OF PIGEONPEA DISEASES, a concise visual-plus-text pocket volume (Information Bulletin #42). M.V. Reddy and colleagues have assembled information on the causal agents, distribution, economic importance, symptoms, epidemiology, and management of major diseases of pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.]. Color photos of disease symptoms and a diagnostic key are included to help with identification.

Another groundnut working group, this one concerned with virus diseases, met at Dundee, UK, in August 1993, and the summary and recommendations from that session have been published as WORKING TOGETHER ON GROUNDNUT VIRUS DISEASES. Scientists from 11 countries participated in the meeting to review progress and craft recommendations for global cooperative research. The 81- page, 1994 publication was edited by D.V.R. Reddy, D. McDonald, and J.P. Moss. For more information on these and other titles, contact: Information Management and Exchange Program, ICRISAT, Patancheru 502 324, Andhra Pradesh, INDIA; e-mail: .

Biological Control Handbook Featuring 56 full color close-up photos, BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF INSECT AND MITE PESTS OF WOODY LANDSCAPE PLANTS: CONCEPTS, AGENTS, AND METHODS, serves as a useful handbook-reference for landscapers, nursery personnel, and homeowners interested in biological control of woody landscape plants. The collaboratively produced, 40-page work by M.J. Raupp, R.G. Van Driesche, and J.A. Davidson, was published in 1993. For information, contact the senior author at: Dept. of Entomology, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA. Guide to Landscape IPM Another landmark IPM publication from the same source (as just above) was published in 1994 and entitled, LANDSCAPE IPM: GUIDELINES FOR INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT OF INSECT AND MITE PESTS ON LANDSCAPE TREES AND SHRUBS. The 106-page, spiral bound work by J.A. Davidson and M.J. Raupp is packed with informative line drawings of pests. An extensive table not only shows, names, and describes key pests, but includes descriptions of symptoms, as well as techniques for monitoring and developing appropriate control strategies for each specific pest. Tips are given for selecting pesticides, and for their safe and effective use. The soft-bound volume is Bulletin 350. For more information, contact: Agricultural Duplicating Service, 6200 Sheridan St., Riverdale, MD 20737, USA. Baculovirus and Biopesticides Recently published, BACULOVIRUS EXPRESSION SYSTEMS AND BIOPESTICIDES, edited by M.L. Shuler et al, divides its 259 pages into three sections: Developing Effective Baculovirus- insect Culture Systems; Bioreactor Design and Scale-up Issues; and, Commercial Application of Insect Cell Culture. The 1995 work contains 11 chapters. For more information, contact: A. Davis, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 605 Third Ave., New York, NY 10158-0012, USA. Recent Publications from BCPC BCPC (British Crop Protection Council) has published a number of titles recently, including:

Monograph #60, entitled FUNGICIDE RESISTANCE, edited by D. Parry, focuses on evaluating and managing resistance. The 418- page text reviews the increasing resistance of pathogens to the main fungicide groups used in a wide cross section of temperate and tropical crops.

The proceedings of the 1994 BRIGHTON CROP PROTECTION CONFERENCEPESTS AND DISEASES, has been collected and published in a three volume set.

A symposium held prior to the 1994 Brighton Conference concerned CROP PROTECTION IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD. R. Black and A. Sweetmore have edited the event's proceedings in BCPC Monograph #61, published in November 1994. The 96-page, softbound work addresses the critical importance of technical, economic and social farm-level constraints.

Copies of THE 1995 BCPC PUBLICATIONS LIST describing current BCPC titles are free and available from: BCPC Publications Sales, Bear Farm, Binfield, Bracknell, Berkshire RG12 5QE, U.K. Phone: 44-0-1734-342-727. Fax: 44-0-1734-341-998. Pest Management Publications Listed A free, full color booklet describes the wide range of widely hailed pest management publications available from the Univ. of California. The booklet, "The Best Tools for Pest Management," shows and describes works ranging from IPM Manuals to pesticide safety guides, including English-Spanish bi-lingual materials. For a copy, contact: ANR Publications, Univ. of California, 6701 San Pablo Ave., Oakland, CA 94608-1239, USA. E-mail: anrpubs@ucdavis.edu. Phone: 01-510-642-2431. Fax: 01-510-643-5470. Acacia Management Handbook P.L. Campbell has prepared WATTLE CONTROL, a new booklet (Handbook No. 3) from the Plant Protection Research Institute (PPRI, South Africa). Wattle [Acacia cyanophylla Lindl.] is the most prevalent alien plant in agriculture in parts of Natal, the Transvaal, and eastern Cape, where infestations reduce grass cover and indigenous vegetation, decrease water supplies, and sometimes lead to increased erosion. The softbound publication offers strategies for effective control including current biocontrol options, and contains over 30 color photos. For more information, contact the author at: PPRI, PO Box 27562, Sunnyside, Pretoria, SOUTH AFRICA.



MATERIALS & EQUIPMENT MINT IPM PROGRAM AVAILABLE A computer-based integrated insect and mite decision-support program has been developed to assist growers, consultants, and field representatives implement effective, economical IPM in mint [Mentha piperita], a high value crop grown for extraction of peppermint oil, and a host to a large complex of arthropods, both harmful and beneficial. The program, IPMP version 2.0, was authored by L. Coop and other experienced entomologists at Oregon State Univ., and comes complete in a 3-ring binder including five 3.5-inch discs, a user's manual, and a copy of the revised version of the 38-page A GUIDE TO PEPPERMINT INSECT AND MITE IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT that includes full-color plates of key pests. IPMP 2.0 requires an IBM 386/486 compatible, with 18 MB of free hard disk space.

Copies of IPMP 2.0, (catalog no. CS195) cost US (post paid in the U.S.). For more information, contact: Integrated Plant Protection Center, 2040 Cordley Hall, Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR 97331-2915, USA. Phone: 01-503-737-3541. Fax: 01-503-737-3080. E-mail: larsons@bcc.orst.edu.

ENTOMOLOGICAL EQUIPMENT SOURCE A mind-boggling array of insect traps, sampling gear, field support equipment, and pest management literature is available from BioQuip, a long-time, U.S.-based, full spectrum supply house. In addition to collecting devices, the firm also offers insect identification materials. A new, 148-page catalog covering the all items has been published in 1995 (US). For more information, contact: BioQuip, 17803 LaSalle Ave., Gardena, CA 90248-3602, USA. Phone: 01-310-324-0620. Fax: 01-310-324-7931. E-mail: bioquip@aol.com. "BAR CODING" FOR CHEMICALS Isotag, a U.S. firm, has developed an internal "bar coding" technique for liquids, based on using deuterium, the non-radioactive isotope of hydrogen. Tags can be made that are uniquely identifiable for virtually any liquid and which do not measurably impact the quality of the host product being tagged. These liquid markers can be used to label hazardous liquids. "Isotags" clarify ownership when spills or leaks occur. This technology, if adapted widely, will significantly increase environmental accountability and the successful enforcement of environmental infractions. Isotag provides the marker compounds, the services to add the tag and take samples of tagged liquids, and the laboratory analytical services to verify the tag presence and tag concentration. For more information, contact: Isotag, attn: B. Volk, e-mail: Isotag@aol.com.


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IPM RESEARCH/TECHNICAL PAPERS --- categories and topics related to IPM

III. FORUM / EDITORIAL viewpoints, opinions, and open discussion of IPM issues. Oregon State Univ. entomologist M. Kogan was an invited speaker at the XVth CONGRESS OF THE BRAZILIAN ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY held in the mountain resort town of Caxambu (pro- nounced "Ca-cham-booh"), in the State of Minas Gerais, about 230 mi southeast of Rio, during 12-16 March. Here are excerpts from Dr. Kogan's notes. The Brazilian Society meets every other year, and the meetings, designated a National Congress, are a major scientific event, well covered by the local news media. The Brazilian Society probably is second only to the Entomological Society of America in number of members. Congress registration reached about 1,200, with significant participation of both undergraduate and graduate students representing every major university in the country. These enthusiastic young people often travel long distances by bus to get to the Congress venue. The atmosphere at the Congress is that of a gala event. The daily schedule begins with three or four concurrent major se sions with topics ranging from the very specific, e.g. in 1995, "The Use of Chrysopidae in Biological Control," by C.F. Carvalho, to the rather broad "Recent advances in IPM," that I was asked to cover. There followed multiple concurrent sessions of submitted papers as well as gatherings that are part of organized conferences running simultaneously with the Congress.

For 1995, the two conferences were the II SYMPOSIUM ON INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT, and the VI NATIONAL MEETING OF PHYTOSANITARISTS, an organization that deals with issues of quarantine and regulations related to movement of biological materials (akin to APHIS in the USA).

Besides experiencing a well organized Congress program, participants received a hefty volume packed with the 790 abstracts of presented papers and posters.

One of the strikingly unique features of these meetings is the ubiquitous presence and involvement of agrochemical companies who provide substantial advance financial support and have a strong presence (with an active logistical supporting staff onsite) during the Congress. The business stands are not only attractive and well stocked with technical literature, after 4:00pm they double as hospitality suites and treat visitors to appetizers and drinks, which makes their display areas extremely popular. Interestingly enough, the relationship of (public sector) scientists with agribusiness does not seem to compromise the independence and integrity of the information exchange process.

IPM is the overwhelming focus of these meetings and industry is capitalizing on it by promoting products that have reputedly performed well in selectivity tests. For example, one company offering a new product for aphid control had a display of live natural enemies: parasitic wasps, carabids, and predaceous pentatomids on soybean plants treated with the new compound. It is apparent that Brazilian entomologists and some of the major agrochemical companies have reached a level of mutual understanding and respect that has been beneficial to both the industry and the public sector. Interestingly, IPM is the common denominator.

- M. Kogan

" Quotes " "IPM can be thought of as a continuum, with one end largely consisting of chemical inputs and minimal time spent in pest management. Along the continuum, growers add tactics such as crop rotation, biological controls, resistant varieties of plants, pheromones (sex hormones) to attract insects, better timing of sprays, and other non-chemical methods. Eventually, they reach the endpoint where they've minimized their use of chemicals, but have increased the amount of time and management skills devoted to their operations." "Pesticides have a place in producing crops, and it's not necessary to eliminate them completely. However, with IPM the farmer uses them more judiciously....... With IPM, growers substitute more information, more intensive management, and more in-field work for pesticides."

A.A. Sorenson, American Farmland Trust (from, FOOD INSIGHT REPORTS, May/June 1993) High on the list of research and technology advances sought by apple growers in the State of New York is the: "Introduction of pest and disease resistance through bio- technology and other available means to further reduce the need for pesticides."

M.V. Durando, Western New York (USA) Apple Growers Association



IV. RESEARCH ROUNDUP research and findings that have an impact on IPM. Integrated Controls for Canegrub In Australia, 19 species of scarab larvae, collectively known as canegrubs, are known to attack sugarcane root systems. Thousands of hectares of sugarcane were damaged before the introduction of organochlorine insecticides in 1948. A controlled-release formulation of chlorpyrifos (suSCon Blue) and a non-residual formulation of ethoprophos (Mocap) replaced the organochlorines in the 1980s. However, recent failures of both these products in some areas intensified the search for alternative controls.

L.N. Robertson and colleagues, writing in the AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH, 46(1), 1995, review the current knowledge of canegrub biology, ecology, and control in Australia. "Integrated Management of Canegrubs in Australia: Current Situation and Future Research Directions," presents an outline of research required to develop sustainable pest management for this pest. Knowledge of the population dynamics of canegrubs, the authors suggest, will be integrated with cultural, chemical, and biological controls as appropriate for each pest in each region. A decision-support system will help pest managers make appropriate choices for management action.

excerpted from: CURR. CONT. Ag, Bio. & Env. Sci., 26(10), March 1995.

Noted Research Papers "Control of Oriental Fruit Moth by Mating Disruption Using Sex Pheromones in the Niagara Peninsula, Ontario," Free, D.J. et al. CAN. ENTOMOLOGIST, 126(6), 1287-1300, November- December 1994. "Cost Efficient Pesticide Reductions: A Study of Sweden," Gren, I-M. ENVIRON. AND RESOURCE ECON., 4, 279-293, 1994.

"Cross Protection Against Virus Diseases in Fruit Trees," Alrefai, R.H., and S.S. Korban. FRUIT VAR. JRNL., 49(1), 21-30, January 1995.

"Effects of Different Integrated Pest Management Programs on Biological Control of Mites on Apple by Predatory Mites (Acari) in Nova-Scotia," Hardman, J.M., R.F. Smith, and E. Bent. ENVIRON. ENT., 24(1), 125-142, February 1995.

"Effects of Intercropping and Fertilizer Application on Weed Control and Performance of Cassava and Maize," Olasan- tan, F.O., E.O. Lucas, and H.C. Ezumah. FIELD CROPS RES., 39(2-3), 63-70, December 1994.

"Effects of Intercropping White Cabbage with Clovers on Pest Infestation and Yield," Theunissen, J, C.J.H. Booij, and L.A.P. Lotz. ENTOMOLOGIA EXPERI. ET APPLICATA, 74(1), 7-16, January 1995.

"Energy Analysis of Tillage and Herbicide Inputs in Alternative Weed Management Systems," Clements, D.R. et al. AGRIC., ECOSYSTEMS & ENVIRON., 52(2-3), 119-128, February 1995.

"Importation, Releases, and Establishment of Neochetina spp (Col: Curculionidae) for the Biological Control of Water Hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes (lil: Pontederiaceae), in Benin, West Africa," VanThielen, R., et al. ENTOMOPHAGA, 39(2), 1994.

"Inheritance of Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis CryIIIA o-endotoxin in Colorado Potato Beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), Rahardja, U., and M.E. Whalon. JRNL. ECON. ENTO., 88(1), 21-26, February 1995.

"Integrated Pest Management and Conservation Behaviors," Glynn, C.J., D.G. Mcdonald, and J.P. Tette. JRNL. OF SOIL AND WATER CONSERV., 50(1), 25-29, January-February 1995.

"Localized Failure of a Weed Biological Control Agent Attributed to Insecticide Drift," Hoffman, J.H., and V.C. Moran. AGRIC., ECOSYSTEMS & ENVIRON., 52(2-3), 197-204, February 1995.

"Management of Helicoverpa-Armigera (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) on Chickpea in Southern India - Thresholds and the Economics of Host Plant Resistance and Insecticide Application," Wightman, J.A., et al. CROP PROT., 14(1), 37-46, February 1995.

"Nozzle Selection for Optimizing Deposition and Minimizing Spray Drift for the AT-502 Air Tractor," Brouse, L.F., et al. TRANS. OF THE ASAE, 37(6), 1725-1732, November-December 1994.

"Reduction of Douglas Fir Beetle Infestation of High-risk Stands by Antiaggregation and Aggregation Pheromones," Ross, D.W., and G.E. Daterman. CAN. JRNL. OF FOR. RESCH., 24(11), 2184-2190, November 1994.

"Spring Migration, Reproductive Behavior, Monitoring Procedures, and Host Preference of Plum Curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Prunus Species in Central Georgia," Yonce, C.E., D.L. Horton, and W.E. Okie. JRNL. OF ENTO. SCI., 30(1), 82-92, January 1995.

"The Value of Information in Herbicide Decision Making for Weed Control in Australian Wheat Crops," Pannell, D.J. JRNL OF AGRIC. AND RES. ECON., 19(2), 366-381, December 1994.





NOTE: Can't locate a journal? Contact IPMnet NEWS. We may be able to provide the needed information.


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U.S. REGIONAL IPM CENTERS AND THE IPM-CRSP --- news, developments


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U.S. AID's IPM-Collaborative Research Support Program (IPM CRSP)


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IPMNET CALENDAR --- recent additions and revisions to a comprehensive global

IV. CALENDAR future events: meetings, seminars, conferences, and training courses that relate to global IPM. NOTE: sponsors and organizers are cordially encouraged to send information about future events to:

IPMnet NEWS, c/o Integrated Plant Protection Center 2040 Cordley Hall, Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331-2915, USA. Fax: 01-503-373-3080 E-mail: deutscha@bcc.orst.edu # = new entry since the last issue of IPMnet NEWS. {+} = additional information. or changes.



1995 24 April-19 May BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF ARTHROPOD PESTS & WEEDS, Ascot, U.K. A joint International Institute of Biological Control/Imperial College course for agricultural and crop pro- tection researchers, extensionists, field trainers in farming, forestry and conservation NGOs. Contact: S. Williamson, IIBC, Silwood Pk., Ascot, Berks. SL5 7TA, U.K. Phone: 44-0344-872999. Fax: 44-0344-875007. E-mail: cabi-iibc@cabi.org. 9 May 47th INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON CROP PROTECTION, Univ. of Gent, BELGIUM. Contact: L. Tirry, Fac. of Agric. and Applied Bio. Sciences, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Gent, BELGIUM. Phone: 32-9-264-6152. Fax: 32-9-264-6239.

14-20 May 11th TRIENNIAL SYMPOSIUM ON FUNGICIDES, Reinhards- brunn, GERMANY. Contact: P. Russel, AgrEvo UK, Chesterford Park, Saffron Walden CB10 1XL, U.K.

26-29 June 3rd INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON POPULATION DYNAMICS OF PLANT INHABITING MITES, DENMARK. For a preliminary pro- gram and other detailed information, contact: G. Nachman, Zoological Institute, Dept. of Population Biology, Univ. of Copenhagen, 15 Universitetsparken, DK 2100 Copenhagen O, DENMARK. Fax: 45 35 32 13 00. E-mail: gnachman@zi.ku.dk.

2-7 July XIII INTERNATIONAL PLANT PROTECTION CONGRESS, "Sus- tainable Crop Protection for the Benefit of All," The Hague, The NETHERLANDS. Includes an IPM symposium. Contact: J.C. Zadoks, Organizer XIII IPPC, c/o Holland Organizing Centre, Parkstraat 29, 2514 JD The Hague, THE NETHERLANDS. Phone: 31-70-365-7850. FAX: 31-70-361-4846.

3-7 July 10th CONGRESS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN AFRICA 1995, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, SOUTH AFRICA. The proposed program includes paper and poster sessions, work- shops, a photographic exhibition (of the "Big Twelve" insects), informal social functions, and a formal conference dinner. Con- tact: M.H. Villet, Department of Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes Univ., Grahamstown 6140, SOUTH AFRICA. Phone: 27 [0]461 318-527. Fax: 27 [0]461 24377. E-mail: zomv@hippo.ru.ac.za.

10-12 July 9TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON CHALLENGES FOR WEED SCIENCE IN A CHANGING EUROPE, Budapest, HUNGARY. Contact: L. Radics, Kerteszeti es Elelmiszeiripari Egyetem, Mezogazdasagi Termelesi Tanszek, Budapest, HUNGARY.

24-28 July 15th ASIAN-PACIFIC WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY CONFERENCE, Dai-ichi Hotel, Tsukuba Science City, JAPAN. Contact: K. Usui, Institute of Applied Biochemistry, Univ. of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305, JAPAN. Phone: 81-298-53-4748. Fax: 81-298-53-4605.

# 3-5 August NATURAL ENEMIES OF WHITEFLIES: COLLECTION AND IDENTIFICATION, International Institute of Entomology Short Course, London, UK. Contact: Training Officer, IIE, 56 Queen's Gate, London SW7 5JR, UK. Phone: 44-171-584-0067. Fax: 44-171-581-1676. E-mail: d.agassiz@cabi.org.

6-10 August THIRD INTERNATIONAL CARIBBEAN CONFERENCE OF ENTOMOLOGY, Cariari Hotel, San Jose, COSTA RICA. Held in conjunction with the 78th Annual Meeting of the Florida Entomological Society. Contact: R. Mizell, IFAS, Univ. of Florida, Agricultural Research Center, Rt 4, Box 4092, Monticello, FL 32344, USA. Phone: 01-904-997-2596. Fax: 01-904-997-8178. E-mail: RFM@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu.

12-16 August AMERICAN PHYTOPATHOLOGICAL SOC. ANNUAL MEETING, D.L. Lawrence Convention Ctr., Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Contact: APS, 3340 Pilot Knob Road, St. Paul, MN 55121-2097, USA. Phone: 01-612-454-7250. Fax: 01-612-454-0766.

23-26 August SYSTEMATICS OF INVERTEBRATES AND MICROORGANISMS GLOBAL WORKSHOP, Cardiff, Wales, U.K. Contact: M.A. Cook, Technical Secretariat, BioNET-INTERNATIONAL, 56 Queen's Gate, London, SW7 5JR, U.K. Phone: 44-171-584 0067. Fax: 44-171-581-0067. E-mail: cabi-bionet@cabi.org.

28 August-2 September 9th SYMPOSIUM OF IOBC/WPRS ON INTEGRATED PLANT PROTECTION IN ORCHARDS/3rd SYMPOSIUM OF ISHS ON INTEGRATED FRUIT PRODUCTION, Cedzyna (near Kielce), POLAND. Contact: R.W. Olszak, Research Institute of Pomology and Floriculture, Pomologiczna 18, PL 96-100 Skierniewice, P.O. Box 105, POLAND. Phone: 48-40-2021. Fax: 48-40-3238. Conference language: English.

September/October 19th BIENNIAL SESSION OF THE ASIA AND PACIFIC PLANT PROTECTION COMMISSION, AUSTRALIA. Contact: APPC, Maliwan Mansion, Phra Atit Road, Bangkok 10200, THAILAND.

# 20-23 November BRIGHTON CONFERENCE, 1995, WEEDS, Brighton, U.K. Contact: CAS Ltd./BCPC, 4 Cavendish Square, London W1M 0BX, U.K. Phone: 44-0-1714-900-900. Fax: 44-0-1716-293-233.

1996 21-26 January 9th INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WEEDS. Contact: J.H. Hoffmann, Zoology Dept., Univ. of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700, SOUTH AFRICA. Fax: 27-21-650-3726. E-mail: hoff@botany.vct.ac.za. 6-9 February WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA, annual meeting, Marriot and Omni Hotels, Norfolk, VA, USA. Contact: WSSA, 1508 W. University Ave., Champaign, IL 61821, USA.

25-28 June INTERNATIONAL WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY, Copenhagen, DENMARK. Two concurrent sessions each day beginning with a keynote address on the session theme. Contact: ICS, PO Box 41, DK-2900 Hellerup, DENMARK; or IWSS, c/o IPPC, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-2915, USA. Phone: 01-503-737- 3541. Fax: 01-503-737-3080. E-mail: larsons@bcc.orst.edu.

# 2-5 July 3RD SYMPOSIUM OF THE EUROPEAN ASSOCIATION OF ACAROLOGISTS, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Theme: "Ecology and Evolution in the Acari." Emphasis will be given to phylogeny, evolutionary ecology, and population dynamics. Contact: T. Korzilius, Population Biology, Univ. of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 320, 1098 SM Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Fax: 31-20-525-7754. Phone: 31-20-525-7736. E-mail: korzilius@bio.uva.nl.

8-10 July INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INSECT PESTS IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT, Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh, U.K. Contact: W. Robinson, Urban Pest Control Resch. Ctr., Dept. of Entomology, VPI&SU, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0319, USA.

27-31 July AMERICAN PHYTOPATHOLOGICAL SOC. ANNUAL MEETING, Indianapolis, IN, USA. Contact: APS, 3340 Pilot Knob Road, St. Paul, MN 55121-2097, USA. Phone: 01-612-454-7250. Fax: 01-612-454-0766.

no date SIXTH INTERNATIONAL PARASITIC WEED SYMPOSIUM, Cordoba, SPAIN. Contact: M.T. Moreno, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Agrario, Apartado 4240, 14080 Cordoba, SPAIN. Fax: 34-57-202721.

IPMnet Sponsors IPMnet, a Global IPM Information Service, was conceived by the Consortium for International Crop Protection (CICP) and developed and implemented with guidance and support from the National Biological Impact Assessment Program (NBIAP) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Consortium, 13 U.S. educational/research institutions with strong interests in research, development, and productive application of rational crop protection and pest management, has been an international presence for over 15 years. Current members are: Univ. of California, Cornell Univ., Univ. of Florida, Univ. of Hawaii, Univ. of Illinois, Univ. of Miami, Univ. of Minnesota, North Carolina State Univ., Oregon State Univ., Univ. of Puerto Rico, Purdue Univ., Texas A&M Univ., and the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.

M. Kogan (Oregon State Univ.) chairs CICP's Board of Directors. R. Ford (Univ. of Illinois) is vice chairman, and G.A. Schaefers (Cornell Univ.) serves as acting executive director. The Consortium maintains a business office at:

CICP, Cornell Univ., NYSAES, Geneva, NY 14456-0462, USA. E-mail: cicp@cornell.edu. Phone: 01-315-787-2252.

IPMnet co-sponsor NBIAP was established to facilitate the applications of biotechnology in agriculture and the environment, and is funded by direct U.S. Congressional appropriation. The program operates a national communications system for biotechnology in the U.S. and is cooperating, through these resources, to assist CICP in globally extending IPM information. D.R. MacKenzie (USDA-CSRS) is NBIAP director. D.M. King (Virginia Tech) administers the IPMnet bulletin board.





The IPMnet NEWS .....is co-sponsored by CICP and NBIAP/U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. Mention of specific products, processes, institutions, organizations, or individuals in the IPMnet NEWS does not imply support nor criticism by CICP, NBIAP, nor any individual associated with either organization. Information in IPMnet NEWS may be reprinted or quoted providing the IPMnet NEWS is identified as the source.

A.E. Deutsch, IPMnet NEWS Coordinator/Editor.





Contributions to the IPMnet NEWS ...... are encouraged from individuals, organizations, and institutions engaged in any aspect of crop protection, and especially IPM. Short items describing experiences, successes, problems, and solutions are welcome. So too are questions, recommendations, viewpoints (pro and con), and IPM-related opinion statements.





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..... may be sent to any of the following: E-mail -> deutscha@bcc.orst.edu Fax > 01-503-737-3080 Postal -> IPMnet NEWS

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This mosaic version of IPMnet NEWS was marked up by J. E. Bacheler for the Cente r for IPM. The Center takes full responsibility for the appearance of this mosai c document.


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