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INTEGRATED PLANT PROTECTION CENTER

IPMnet NEWS


August 2006, Issue no. 149
ISSN: 1523-7893 Copyright 2005



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IPM NEWS --- international IPM news and programs

Transgenics: Progress and the Unforseen
Contrary to some impressions, transgenic crops didn't spontaneously arise from swamp gasses in Transylvania, even though early on profaned as "frankencrops" by imaginative opponents and the popular press. Lab- oratory and field research (most assuredly by profit oriented companies) devolved "genetically enhanced" crops that dissuade attack by key pest insects, shake off effects of non-selective herbicides, or both in crops with "stacked" genes.

An accelerating contingent of growers, initially in North America, adopted the new technology. Other nations began selective acceptance of genetically modified (GE) crops. Now that the GE genie has been out of the bottle for over a decade, the anticipated positives realized have been partially diluted by the law of unintended (if not unforseen) consequences plunging a segment of global commercial agriculture into a roiling kettle of controversy. Here, then, a very limited overview.

First the positive side. Reports documented cases of overall sig- nificantly lowered pesticide use. Canada halved its agricultural pesticides usage. Reduced pesticide application led to lower labor, fuel, and other input costs. Cut-backs in organophosphate-based products reduced hazardous exposure to applicators. Less pesticide used yielded environmental benefits such as reduced runoff from fields and degrada- tion of ground water and other water bodies. Consumers welcomed re- duced pesticide residue on produce. Major Asian nations introduced GE cotton and experienced grower adoption. According to one report, in 2005 GE cropsen totowere planted on 90 million hectares (222 million acres) in 21 countries.

Then the unforseen strode onstage. For example, a recent study found that farmers in China growing GE cotton had reaped cost savings by drastically reducing pesticide usage, but in doing so inadvertently created a vacuum for meteoric population build-up of non-target, un- controlled "secondary" pest insects. The response: reinstate applica- tion of previously shelved insecticides, erode earlier savings, and even endure economic loss from the higher cost of Bt seed on top of costs from resumed pesticide cost. The study's authors deemed the situation a serious threat to continued regional Bt cotton planting.

The arrival and merits of glyphosatic herbicide-resistant (HR) seed led farmers to adopt the technology. Soon scattered reports noted pre- viously controlled weeds now survived treatment, an outcome of reliance on (and some have written, an overuse of) the glycine herbicide group coupled with random plant physiology. In a recent paper, H. Sandermann cites "A certain degree of resistance mismanagement and an inadequate testing of the ecological effects of extensive glyphosate use."

In fact, the International Survey of Herbicide Resistant Weeds (www.weedscience.org was established to monitor the evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds. It now lists: 310 resistant biotypes, 183 species (110 dicots and 73 monocots), and over 270,000 fields haunted by formerly affected plants.

Other issues with GE crops revolve around public acceptance or rejection, the challenge of keeping GE and "conventionally" produced items segregated, international markets and trade, and governmental stands on allowing or banning GE crop production. Costs continue to be controversial regarding GE versus non-GE seed, an issue that factors into the need for adopting new farming methods, some of which run counter to traditional procedures such as saving seed from a previous crop to plant the next season.

In a recent paper that bravely attempts a review of just the insect management aspect of GE crops, P. Christou and colleagues suggest that, "Transgenic insect-resistant plants have a track record of success" which will become evermore evident, but caution that "bold and daring strategies need to be explored to ...... provide an overall balance of cost versus benefit."

References:

"Global Biotech Crop Area Continues to Soar in 2005 After a Decade of Commercialization," James, C. * ISAAA BRIEFS No. 34-2005:Press Release, International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications, www.isaaa.org. Die for Bt Cotton in China," Lang, S. * CHRONICALE ONLINE (newsletter), Cornell Univ., USA, 25 July 2006. www.news.cornell.edu Biotechnology: Ecological Case Studies on Herbicide Resistance," Sandermann, H. * TRENDS IN PLANT SCI., 11(7), 323-328, July 2006.

"Recent Developments and Future Prospects in Insect Pest Control in Transgenic Crops," Christou, P.,et al * TRENDS IN PLANT SCI., 11(6), 302-308, June 2006.


*GLOBAL IPM SNAPSHOTS*

* Chemical inoculation of young potato plants may enhance cycle-long resistance toPhytophthora infestans(late blight). -> A.B. Andreu, ABAndreu@mdp.edu.ar.

* In California, four counties have supported initiatives to ban or limit production of GE crops, while 18 other counties have rejected any ban or limitation. (Excerpted from news reports and AgBioView.)

* Habitats within agricultural landscapes are likely to require preservation and restoration to effectively maintain native parasitoid populations. -> P.C. Marino, PMarino@mun.ca.

* Combining endophytic fungi and grass has lead to strains with properties that deter birds and reduce avian pest caused problems. -> C. Pennell, Chris.Pennell@agresearch.co.nz.


*EDITOR'S NOTE*

All websites may be created equal, but as any internet user has discovered, not all prosper. Some sites remain vibrant, dynamic, and current while others are planted with the best of intent only to bloom, and, for several key reasons, quietly slide into the electronic trough of withered inactivity. Regrettably, the once active and healthy website for IPMnet NEWS has fallen into a serious coma and languishesinactive, untended, and moribund. Prospects for its recovery are dim.

IPMnet apologizes to all who may have relied on its website to read the NEWS. In particular, the undersigned regrets the website's plight and any inconvenience and vexation it has caused. Anyone who feels strongly that the IPMnet NEWS website should be resuscitated and re- turned to the rank of a useful information resource, please do email us expressing your sentiments. Miracles happen occasionally.

Cordially, A.E. Deutsch, editor/coordinator IPMnet NEWS
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IPM MEDLEY --- publications and other IPM information resources

*PUBLICATIONS PERUSED*

Note to AUTHORS, EDITORS, AND PUBLISHERS: IPMnet NEWS welcomes mentioning any publication focused on, or related to, crop or amenity plant IPM. To assure coverage, please send a review copy of the publication along with full information to IPMnet NEWS (see address at end of this file). Thanks. ....................... {$} = indicates a publication can be purchased, or that there may be charges for handling and postage.

RESISTANCE STRATEGIES The New Zealand Plant Protection Society (NZPPS) has a clear pos- ition on the issue of pest resistance to pesticides: whether involving insects, weeds, pathogens, mites, or nematodes the increasing complexity of the topic is highly relevant to agriculture and horticulture. NZPPS members have been at the forefront of developing, documenting, and dis- bursing pesticide resistance strategies, a recent tangible example of which is the 2005 publication, PESTICIDE RESISTANCE: Prevention and Management Strategies 2005, published by the Society. In this straight- forward, 172-page treatise, editors N.A. Martin,et al have compiled and organized a body of applicable information for well over 20 specific resistance situations. Each situation presented includes: background, reason (i.e., need) for a strategy, elements of a resistance management and prevention strategy, and supplemental information. The softbound work, which also lays out general principles of pesticide resistance, complements data on the pesticide resistance pages of the NZPPS website www.nzpps.org where, in addition to established strategies, periodic updates appear. {$} -> S. Reid, NZPPS, PO Box 11094, Hastings, NEW ZEALAND. secretary@nzpps.org.

THE STERILE INSECT STORY Said to be the first book of its kind, STERILE INSECT TECHNIQUE, Principles and Practice in Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management, takes a generic, comprehensive, and global approach in describing elements of SIT (sterile insect technique). The substantial (802 pages), 2005 volume scientifically evaluates the strengths, weaknesses, successes, and failures of the SIT. V.A. Dyck and co-editors present a wealth of information and references prepared by a 50-author international group (19 countries represented reflecting the global breadth of the SIT). The hardbound work contains material not found to date in any single previous publication. Subjects covered range from the technique's history, basis, components, application, economic and management con- siderations, and impact, to its prospects for improvement and greater utilization in the future. As an in-depth review of many aspects of the SIT and its integration into area-wide IPM, the book should appeal to a broad contingent of crop protection researchers and practitioners as well as instructors, students, and policy makers. {$} -> Springer PO Box 17, 3300 AA Dordrecht, THE NETHERLANDS. Web: www.springer.com.

A PROFILE OF FUSARIUM SPECIES A 2006 work published by the American Phytopathological Society presents concise descriptions of mycotoxin-producingFusariumspecies, both major and minor, and other biologically active metabolites po- tentially harmful to human and animal health. FUSARIUM MYCOTOXINS, Chemistry, Genetics, and Biology, by A.E. Desjardins, discusses past and present research, noting landmarks over nearly two centuries. Reference tables summarize the distribution of mycotoxins among _Fusariumspecies. The hardbound, 268-page monograph includes 27 black and white images as well as chapters that update the molecular genetics of selected mycotoxins, plus sections addressing the impor- tance of mycotoxins in plant diseases. The thorough review and anal- ysis is anticipated to be a useful resource to a variety of specialists. {$} -> APS Press, 3340 Pilot Knob Rd., St. Paul, MN 55121, USA. Fax: 1-651-454-0766. Phone: 1-651-454-7250. Web: www.shopapspress.org.

NON-CROP PEST CONTROL The second, extensively updated, edition of RESIDENTIAL, INDUSTRI- AL, AND INSTITUTIONAL PEST CONTROL has added information about school IPM programs, including how to select appropriate pesticides (when ap- plicable), and other key factors. The 256-page manual offers answers for solving institutional and household pest problems, emphasizing structural, food, and fabric pests, along with extended information for managing rodents, birds, and weeds. A user friendly format includes 18 tables and 41 "sidebars" that expand on the concepts discussed and, in many instances, provide handy checklists for monitoring and control action. Deft use of a second ink color for variety and emphasis and a ton of photos (100) and dozens of other graphics enhance this 2006 softbound reference. Author P.J. O'Connor-Marer has included review questions (and answers) to assist in studying for examinations, as well as a glossary, suggestions for additional reading, and a detailed index. ANR pub. no. 3334. {$} -> ANR Catalog, Univ. of California, 6701 San Pablo Ave., 2nd. Floor, Oakland, CA 94608-1239, USA. anrcatalog@ucdavis.edu. Fax: 1-510-643-5470. Web: danrcs.ucdavis.edu.

*WEB, PUBLICATION, CD, AND VIDEO NOTES*

IPMnet NEWS welcomes mentioning any website, publication, CD, or video focused on, or related to, crop or amenity plant IPM. Please send a review copy of the item to the address at end of this file; for a website, send the URL to: IPMnet@science.oregonstate.edu.

RECORDING WORST WEED DATA

The Australian Government's Bureau of Rural Sciences has announced publication of A FIELD MANUAL FOR SURVEYING AND MAPPING NATIONALLY SIGNIFICANT WEEDS, a 52-page, 2006 volume that sets forth and explains standardized, systematic procedures for collecting core weed infestation data for mapping those plants that are Australia's 20 "weeds of national significance" or WONS. The manual's foreword pointedly notes that "weeds are one of the major problems affecting Australia's natural ecosystems and agricultural vegetation." Authors I. McNaught,et al promote the systematic recording of key information regarding weed infestations, and the parameters for recording it. Key core information to identify and monitor a weed site is grouped under 15 headings or "attributes" that are clearly defined in the Manual. The rationale set forth for detailed information: solid data underpins priorities for follow-up action. The Manual is available both in free PDF on-line and printed versions at: www.affashop.gov.au thanks to L. Brown for information. TRANSGENICS AND RISK

A technical meeting organized in 2002 focused on the emerging topic of transgenic insect technology, its impacts and implications. Now the proceedings for that meeting have been published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 2006 as STATUS AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF THE USE OF TRANSGENIC ARTHROPODS IN PLANT PROTECTION. The softbound, 162-page report particularly focuses on the emergence "of a regulatory environment in which an appropriate risk assessment framework could be developed," as stated in the meeting summary. The jointly sponsored event brought together a.) scientists involved in transgenic technology, and b.) experts in the field of risk assessment. Three working groups were formed and each prepared a working paper for the meeting; these appear in the publication, which is IAEA-TEDIC-1483. {$}? -> FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna, AUSTRIA. SUPPORT FOR SPECIALTY CROPS

Under the slogan "low acreage, high value," the IR-4 Project has been a major resource of pest management tools for specialty crop production in the U.S. The Project accomplishes this by developing research data to support and strengthen product registration approval for markets that might not be pursued by product manufacturers. These facts and much more information are delivered in the Project's 2005 YEAR IN REVIEW, a colorful and informative 8-page brochure. A country-wide map reveals which 11 U.S. states are leaders in producing specialty crops and thus particularly reliant on the IR-Project for assistance. An important facet is clearance gained for food related crops. Funding for the program comes from several, primarily federal, sources. -> IR-4, Rutgers Univ., 681 US Route 1 South, North Brunswick, NJ 08902-3390, USA. contactIR4@aesop.rutgers.edu. Fax: 1-732-932-8481. Phone: 1-732-932-9575. GLOBAL INVASIVES DATABASE

A free CD-ROM version of the GLOBAL INVASIVE SPECIES DATABASE, a listing of invasive species that threaten biodiversity, is now available after its introduction at a May 2006 meeting. Invasives can, and often do, generate economic and environmental impacts. Challenges for man- aging invasives include the lack and inaccessibility of appropriate in- formation about impacts, pathways, distribution, risks, and managemen methods. The database is designed to provide relevant, expert created global information to agencies, resource managers, decision makers, and interested individuals. The database can be accessed in two ways: online at www.issg.org or via a free copy of CD-ROM that can be requested from M. Browne, M.Browne@auckland.ac.nz, by sending a name and postal address. thanks to M. Browne for information. BIOTECH CROPS IN THE U.S.

The Economic Research Service (ERS) of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture has published up-to-date, detailed data sets for ADOPTION OF GENETIC- ALLY ENGINEERED CROPS IN THE U.S. based on statistics provided by the National Agricultural Statistics Service. The numbers reveal that soybean and cotton genetically engineered (GE) with herbicide-tolerant traits have been the most widely and rapidly adopted GE crops in the U.S., followed by insect-resistant cotton and corn. The compiled data, covering the period 2000-2006, summarize both the GE percentage of total planting as well as geographical extent of GE crops adoption. See: www.ers.usda.gov The tables will be revised annually to reflect GE crop adoption -> J. Fernandez-Cornejo, JorgeF@ers.usda.gov. HANDBOOKS NOW ON-LINE

For many years crop protection specialists in the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. collaborated to produce printed regional pest man- agement handbooks individually addressing weed, insect, and disease management. Now all three works, regarded as invaluable current ref- erences containing information with far broader applicability than their indicated limited geographical focus, have been translated into freely available on-line versions, as well as still being offered in hard copy format. The three volumes, now referred to as "IPM Handbooks, can be found at ipmnet.org Each of the three sites include information for ordering the respective print versions.


*PROFESSIONAL OPPORTUNITIES* WEED SCIENTIST, Carbondale, IL, USA * Evaluate the effect of cropping systems and herbicide use on weed diversity and the soil seed bank; plan and implement data collection from multiple sites; manage and evaluate greenhouse trials; analyze and summarize results; effectively communicate with growers, peers, and industry representatives. * REQUIRED: PhD in weed science or re- lated field; ability to work independently; training in data entry and analysis; excellent management, planning, and organizational skills; exceptional record of publishing in refereed journals; willing to work with pesticides, work in adverse environmental conditions, and carry or lift heavy materials. * CONTACT: B.C. Young, Dept. of Plant, Soil, and Agric. Systems, Southern Illinois Univ., 1205 Lincoln Dr., MC-4415, Carbondale, IL 62901, USA. BGYoung@siu.edu. Phone: 1-618-453-7679.

EPIDEMIOLOGY RESEARCHER, Ames, IA, USA * Investigate soybean rust epidemiology; study factors contributing to regional disease outbreaks; help devise models pre- dicting continental movement/dispersal of soybean rust. * REQUIRED: PhD with training in plant disease epidemiology, ecology, or clima- tology; computation and quantitative analysis skills; experience with modeling; ability to effectively communicate with colleagues, government, industry, and academy. * CONTACT: X.B. Yang, Plant Path. Dept., Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA 50011, USA. Fax: 1-515-294-9420. XBYang@iastate.edu. Phone: 1-515-294-8826. Web: www.plantpath.iastate.edu.

*EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, & SERVICES* PHINDING PHEROMONES

A UK-based firm synthesizes, produces, and markets a wide variety of pheromone components, intermediates, and pheromone blends. In addition to a list of materials in stock or previously manufactured, Cardiff Pheromones can provide synthesis of new compounds which may not be commercially available currently. The organization also offers raw material pheromones to manufacturers of insect traps, as well as to governments, research, and academic institutions. -> Cardiff Phero- mones, Unit 10, Willowbrook Tech. Units, St. Mellons, Cardiff CF3 0EF, UK. Fax/phone: 44-0-2920-779612. info@cariffpheromones.com. Web: www.cardiffpheromones.com.

GUIDE TO ENTOMOLOGICAL SOURCES

The Entomological Society of America (ESA), publisher of the ENTOMOLOGY BUYER'S GUIDE, is currently accepting applications from suppliers, services, and organizations associated with entomology and related biological sciences, for listing in the Guide's next (printed) edition. As of August 2006, listings are free. The Guide is available on the ESA website at www.entsoc.org by clicking on "search the Buyer's Guide." The unique reference is or- ganized by functional categoriesranging from area meters to web sites and resourcesand by countries, as clearly shown on the ESA's website. -> C. Stelzig, Director of Marketing, ESA, 100001 Derekwood Ln., Suite 100, Lanham, MD 20706-4876, USA. CStelzig@entsoc.org. Fax: 1-301-731-4538. Phone: 1-301-731-4535.

RANGE OF REPELLENTS

A U.S. firm manufactures and markets a line of products said to repel deer and other animals while being environmentally friendly. The range of Bobbex materials repel through both odor and taste by using an amalgam of fish, fish products, seaweed, eggs, garlic, and other naturally occurring ingredients. Bobbex is offered as a foliar spray in either ready-to-use or concentrated form. The manufacturer notes that it is "long lasting, non-burning and will not wash off in rain." Bobbex also is said to help protect plants by retaining moisture during periods of low moisture availability. The product is offered in a variety of container sizes including a trigger activated spray bottle. -> Bobbex, Inc., 52 Hattertown Rd., Newtown, CT 06470, USA. bobbex@compuserve.com. Fax: 1-203-426-1160. Phone: 1-203-792-4449. Web: www.bobbex.com.
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IPM RESEARCH/TECHNICAL PAPERS --- categories and topics related to IPM

Selections from current literature. IPMnet NEWS will gladly provide the address (including email, if available) for first authors in the following titles. Request from: IPMnet@science.oregonstate.edu.

*SELECTED TITLES*

Phytopathology """""""""""""" "Assessment of Predacity and Efficacy of Athrobotrys dactyloides for Biological Control of Root Knot Disease of Tomato," Kumar, D., and K.P. Singh. * JRNL. OF PHYTOPATH., 154(1), 1-5, January 2006.

"Integrated Disease Management of Leaf Spot and Spotted Wilt of Peanut," Cantonwine, E.G.,et al * PLANT DIS., 90(4), 493-500, April 2006.

"Integrated Management of Powdery Mildew of Mango in Egypt," Nofal, M.A., and W.M. Haggag. * CROP PROT., 25(5), 480-486, May 2006.

Weed Science """""""""""" "Effects on Weeds of Management in Newly Converted Organic Crop Rotations in Denmark," Rasmussen, I.A.,et al * AGRIC., ECOSYS. AND ENVIRON., 113(1-4), 184-195, April 2006.

"The Critical Period of Weed Control in Double-Cropped Soybean," Arslan, M.,et al * PHYTOPARA., 34(2), 159-166, 2006.

"Time of Weed Removal with Glyphosate Affects Corn Growth and Yield Components," Cox, W.J.,et al * AGRON. JRNL., 98(2), 349-353, March-April 2006.

Entomology """""""""" "A GIS-based Approach for Areawide Pest Management: the Scales of Lygus hesperusMovements to Cotton from Alfalfa, Weeds, and Cotton," Carriere, Y.,et al * ENTOM. EXP. ET APPLIC., 118(3), 203-210, March 2006.

"Host-Parasitoid Interactions in a Transgenic Landscape: Spatial Proximity Effects of Host Density," White, J.A., and D.A. Andow. * ENVIRON. ENTOM., 34(6), 1493-1500, December 2005.

BtSub-section """""""""""""""" "Potential Adoption and Management of Insect-resistant Potato in Peru, and Implications for Genetically Engineered Potato," Buijs, J.,et al * ENVIRON. BIOSAFETY RESCH., 4(3), 179-188, July-September 2005.

"Three Seasons of Subsistence Insect-resistant Maize in South Africa: Have Smallholders Benefitted?," Gouse, M.,et al * JRNL. OF AGROBIO. MGMT. & ECON., 9(1), 15-22, 2006. Web: www.agbioforum.org """""""""" "Successes and Failures in the Use of Parasitic Nematodes for Pest Control," Georgis, R.,et al * BIOL. CONTROL, 38(1), 103-123, July 2006.

General """"""" "Integrating the Study of Non-native Plant Invasions Across Spatial Scales," Pauchard, A., and K. Shea. * BIOL. INVASIONS, 8(3), 399-413, April 2006.

"Will Agbiotech Applications Reach Marginalized Farmers? Evidence from Developing Countries," Spielman, D.J.,et al * AgBioForum, 9(1), 23-30, 2006. See: www.agbioforum.org.
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U.S. REGIONAL IPM CENTERS AND THE IPM-CRSP --- news, developments

A Guide to Beneficials
Entomologists at Michigan State Univ. (USA) have published a new, pocket-size, 8.9x12.7cm (3.5x5.0 in.) guide for IDENTIFYING NATURAL ENEMIES IN FIELD CROPS. The 46-page publication divides beneficial in- sects into major groups such as beetles, true bugs, spiders, and more, and includes full color photos accompanied by brief descriptions and distinguishing characteristics. The guide, compiled by M. Gardner,et al arose from the importance of correctly identifying beneficials who play a critical role in managing pest insect populations. With a spiral lay-flat bound, plastic-coated page format, the guide, with glossary and index, provides a useful field reference. Sample pages can be view- ed at; ipm.msu.edu Ext. bull. E2949. {$} -> MSU Bulletin Office, 117 Central Stores, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI 48824-1001, USA. Fax: 1-517-353-7168. Phone: 1-517-353-6740. Web: www.emdc.msue.msu.edu. thanks to J. Landis for information.

Aspects of Safe Secure Storage
The Univ. of Florida (USA) extension has developed a 6-unit TRAINING MODULE FOR THE SAFE AND SECURE STORAGE OF PESTICIDES AND FERTILIZERS as part of a disaster handbook. The module, freely downloaded from disaster.ifas.ufl.edu has 6 units, each of which contains: a narrative providing background information; a PowerPoint presentation paralleling the narrative; pre- and post-tests and an evaluation; and (in selected units) table-top exercises. Units in the flexible module can be used separately or in combination depending on need, audience, or other factors. Materials also can be copied and used to create a workbook. thanks to P.C. Jepson for information.

California Plant Protection
The Univ. of California's active Statewide IPM Program is a joint publisher of the UC PLANT PROTECTION QUARTERLY along with the UC Kearney Plant Protection Group. The publication can be freely accessed on line at www.uckac.edu The current issue, July 2006, features "Olive Fruit Fly Management Guidelines for 2006."
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U.S. AID's IPM-Collaborative Research Support Program (IPM CRSP)

New Director Takes Program Reins
An entomologist with long and successful involvement in the realm of biological control research was recently appointed director of the U.S.-based Integrated Pest Management-Collaborative Research Support Program (IPM-CRSP), an activity sponsored by the U.S. Agency for International Development.

R. Muniappan, a scientist/administrator with more than 30 years of association with the University of Guam (USA) and the Guam Department of Agriculture, was selected to lead the IPM-CRSP following a long search process. He assumed the post in mid-July 2006 after fulfilling several previous short-term commitments.

Dr. Muniappan, or "Muni" as he likes to be called, became synony- mous with efforts to manage the noxious weed Chromolaena odorata (Siam weed) using biocontrol methods. He was a key figure in efforts to expand C. odorata biocontrol and implementation programs across a wide swath of Pacific lands affected by this perennial shrub native to South and Central America, but now found in many warm, humid tropical regions.

He also was instrumental in organizing several international work- shops devoted to biocontrol ofC. odorataand remains as a contact point for the upcoming 7TH INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT OF CHROMOLAENA ODORATA slated for 11-14 September 2006 in Taiwan.

Muni's name appears as author or co-author of numerous papers and publication chapters as well as a contributor/editor to, and a prime mover behind, the Chromolaena Newsletter for many years.

Dr. Muniappan, when asked about the IPM-CRSP's programmatic future clearly indicated that the direction was firmly established and that forward focus would be on efficient implementation. "I'm pleased," he said, "to join this well-regarded and highly active program." -> R. Muniappan, Director, IPM-CRSP, OIRED, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA. RMuni@vt.edu. Phone: 1-540-231-3516.
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IPMNET CALENDAR --- recent additions and revisions to a comprehensive global

NOTES:

1=> This IPMnet CALENDARUpdate lists only: (N)ew events that have not been cited previously in the IPMnet CALENDAR or IPMnet NEWS; and, [R]evised events, incorporating new information compared to a previous listing in the CALENDAR or NEWS.

2=> The complete IPMnet CALENDAR is e-mailed annually to all IPMnet e-mail subscribers, but is kept up to date and may be requested any time from IPMnet at IPMnet@science.oregonstate.edu.

3=> Please send information about future events, or revisions, to: IPMnet NEWS at IPMnet@science.oregonstate.edu. Information listed in the IPMnet CALENDAR was supplied by, and collected from, various sources; IPMnet greatly appreciates all cooperation.

*(N)ewly Listed, or [R]evised Entries: as of 31 August 2006*

16-21 September * 5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ARTHROPODS--
    CHEMICAL, PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS, Blialka
    Tatrzanska/Zakopane, POLAND.  Contact: D. Konopiska, Fac. of
    Chem., Univ. of Wroclaw, Ul. F.jolliot-Curie 14, 50-383
    Wroclaw, POLAND.  Mailto:DK@wchuwr.chem.uni.wroc.pl.
---------
17-22 September * 8TH EUROPEAN CONGRESS OF ENTOMOLOGY, Izmir,
    TURKEY.  Contact: S. Kismali, Plant Prot. Dept., Fac. of
    Agric., Ege Univ., Izmir, TURKEY.  Fax: 90-232-374-4848.
    Mailto:Kismali@ziraat.ege.edu.tr.
    Web: http://www.ece2006.org.
---------
18-20 September * 9TH INTERNATIONAL FUNGAL BIOLOGY CONFERENCE,
    "Impact of Genomics on Fungal Biology," Nancy, FRANCE.  Contact:
    H. Slater, New Phytologist, Bailrigg House, Lancaster Univ.,
    Lancaster LA1 4YE, UK.  Mailto:H.Slater@lancaster.ac.uk.
    Fax: 44-1524-594696.  Phone: 44-1524-594691.
    Web: http://www.newphytologist.org/fungal-genomics/default.htm.
---------
18-21 September * 14TH ANNUAL NORTH AMERICAN WEED MANAGEMENT
    ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE, Calgary, ALB, CANADA.  Contact:
    K. Nielsen, phone: 1-403-845-4444.  Web: http://www.nawma.org/.
    Mailto:KNielsen@county.clearwater.ab.ca.
---------
21 September * ADVANCES IN PEST MANAGEMENT 2006, Peterborough, UK.
    Contact: Assn. of Applied Biologists, c/o Warwick HRI,
    Wellesbourne, Warwick CV35 9EF, UK.  Mailto:Carol.aab@warwick.uk.
    Fax: 44-0-1789-470234.  Web: http://www.aab.org.uk.
---------
24-27 September * AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND ENTOMOLOGICAL
    SOCIETIES JOINT CONFERENCE, Adelaide, SA, AUSTRALIA.  Contact:
    D. Hopkins, mailto:Hopkins.Dennis@saugov.sa.gov.au.
    Web: http://www.agric.nsw.gov.au/Hort/ascu/myrmecia/events.htm.
---------
24-28 September * 15TH AUSTRALIAN WEEDS CONFERENCE, "Managing Weeds
    in a Changing Climate," Adelaide, SA, AUSTRALIA.  Contact: Plevin
    and Assoc. Pty. Ltd., PO Box 54, Burnside, 5066 SA, AUSTRALIA.
    Mailto:events@plevin.com.au.  Phone: 61-8-8379-8222.
    Fax: 61-8-8379-8177.  Web: http://www.plevin.com.au/15AWC2006/.
    NOTE: event to now include a symposium on: "Animal-Dispersed
    Weeds;" contact: E. White, mailto:Eve.White@nrm.qld.gov.au.
---------
24-30 September * 52ND ANNUAL MEETING INTERAMERICAN SOCIETY FOR
    TROPICAL HORTICULTURE, Isla Verde, San Juan, PUERTO RICO (60-70
    percent of papers concern pest management).  Contact: M. del
    Carmen Libran, Dept. de Horticultura, Univ. of Puerto Rico,
    Mayaguez, PR. Mailto:isth2006@uprm.edu.
    Fax/phone: 1-787-832-4040, ext. 3852.
    Web: http://agricultura.uprm.edu/horticultura/isth2006/index1.html.
---------
25-28 September * 55TH DEUTSCHE PFLANZENSCHUTZTAGUNG, Gottingen,
    GERMANY.  Contact: Deutsche Pflanzenschutztagung, Messeweg 11-12,
    38104 Braunschweig, GERMANY.  Mailto:info@pflanzenschutztagung.de.
    Web: http://www.pflanzenschutztagung.de.
    Also, INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR PEST INFORMATION (ISPI) MEETING,
    contact: B. Zelazny, ISPI, Eulerweg 3, D-64347 Griesheim,
    GERMANY.  Mailto:ispi@pestinfo.org.  Phone: 49-61-558-80682.
    Web: http://www.pestinfo.org.
---------
25-28 September * INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY
    OF INSECT PARASITOIDS, Antibes, Juan les Pins, FRANCE.
    Contact: E. Wajnberg, mailto:Wajnberg@antibes.inra.fr.
    Web: http://bepar.antibes.inra.fr/events/events.htm.
---------
29 September-02 October * ASSOCIATION OF NATURAL BIO-CONTROL
    PRODUCERS (ANBP) ANNUAL MEETING, Tahoe City, CA, USA.
    Contact: ANBP, 2230 Martin Dr., Tustin Ranch, CA 92782, USA.
    Mailto:execdir@anbp.org.  Fax/phone: 1-714-544-8295.
---------
02-04 October * IOBC/WPRS WORKING GROUP, INTEGRATED PLANT PROTECTION
    IN FRUIT CROPS (STONE FRUIT), Bellegarde, FRANCE.  Contact:
    J. Lichou, CTIFL, Centre de Balandran, BP 32, 30127 Bellegarde,
    FRANCE.  Mailto:Lichou@ctifl.fr.
---------
08-12 October * 7TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON EGG PARASITOIDS,
    Piracicaba, SP, BRAZIL.  Contact: J.R. Parra, convenor,
    mailto:eggparas@esalq.usp.br.
    Web: http://www.esalq.usp.br/eggparas/.
---------
15-21 October * INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON NOVEL AND SUSTAINABLE
    WEED MANAGEMENT IN ARID AND SEMI-ARID AGRO-ECOSYSTEMS,
    Rehovot, ISRAEL.  Contact: mailto:wgarid@agri.huji.ac.il.
    Web: http://www.agri.huji.ac.il/aridconference.
---------
16-17 October * 5TH INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR, INTERNATIONAL PERMANENT
    WORKING GROUP FOR COCOA PESTS AND DISEASES, San Jose, COSTA RICA.
    Contact: U. Krauss, CABI-CLARC, Gordon St., Curepe, TRINIDAD AND
    TOBAGO.  Mailto:U.Krauss@cabi.org.  Fax: 1-868-663-2859.
    Phone: 1-868-662-4173.  Web: http://www.cabi.org.
---------
16-18 October * 5TH MEETING, IOBC/WPRS SOIL INSECT PESTS SUB-GROUP,
    Laimburg, 30040 Auer/Ora, ITALY.  Contact: J. Enkerli,
    Agroscope FAL Reckenholz, Reckenholzstrasse 191, 8046 Zurich,
    SWITZERLAND.  Mailto:Juerg.Enkerli@fal.admin.ch.
---------
16-20 October * INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PESTICIDE USE IN
    DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: ENVIRONMENTAL FATE, EFFECTS AND PUBLIC
    HEALTH IMPLICATIONS, Arusha, TANZANIA.  Contact: M.A. Kishimba,
    Chemistry Dept., Univ. of Dar es Salaam, PO Box 35061, Dar es
    Salaam, TANZANIA.  Mailto:Kishimba@chem.udsm.ac.tz.
    Phone: 255-22-241-0244.
---------
23-24 October * 1ST ANNUAL BIOCONTROL INDUSTRY MEETING, Lucerne,
    SWITZERLAND.  Contact: FiBL, Ackerstrasse / Postfach
    CH-5070 Frick, SWITZERLAND.  Fax: 41-62-865-7273.
    Phone: 41-62-865-7272.  Web: http://www.abim-lucerne.ch.
---------
24-27 October * 5TH INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON MANAGEMENT OF THE
    DIAMONDBACK MOTH AND OTHER CRUCIFER PESTS, Beijing, CHINA.
    Contact: L. Guangshu, Inst. of Veg./Flowers, CAAS, 12
    Zhongguancun Nandajie, Beijing 100081, CHINA. Fax: 86-10-621-74123.
    Phone: 86-10-689-19531.  Mailto:Liugsh2008@yahoo.com.cn.
    Web: http:www.ciccst.org.cn/IWMDMOCP.
---------
05-08 November * 22ND IWGO (pest insects of maize) CONFERENCE,
    Vienna, AUSTRIA.  Contact: U. Kuhlmann, CABI Biosci. Swiss
    Ctr., Rue des Grillons 1, 2800 Delemont, SWITZERLAND.
    Mailto:U.Kuhlmann@cabi.org.
    Web: http://www.iwgo.org/conference/Vienna_2006/.
---------
06-09 November * 13TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH CONFERENCE ON
    METHYL BROMIDE ALTERNATIVES AND EMISSIONS REDUCTION, Orlando, FL,
    USA.  Contact: MBAO, 6556 N. Dolores Ave., Fresno, CA 93711-1366,
    USA.  Fax: 1-559-449-9037.  Phone: 1-559-449-9035.
    Mailto:Gobernauf@agresearch.nu.  Web: http://www.mbao.org.
---------
19-22 November * 9TH ARAB CONGRESS OF PLANT PROTECTION, Damascus,
    SYRIA.  Contact: S. Al-Chabi, GSCAR, PO Box 113, Douma, SYRIA.
    Mailto:S.Shaabi@acpp-sy.org.
    Web: http://www.9acpp-sy.org/registration.pdf.
---------
27-29 November * CANADIAN WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY ANNUAL MEETING,
    Victoria, BC, CANADA.  Contact: V. Brookes, Pacific Agri-Food
    Resch. Centre, Box 1000, 6947 #7 Highway, Agassiz, BC V0M 1A0,
    CANADA.  Mailto:BrookesV@agr.gc.ca.
    Web: http://www.cwss-scm.ca/coming_events.htm.
---------
29 November-01 December * 2006 NATIONAL (U.S.) SOYBEAN RUST
    SYMPOSIUM, St. Louis, MO, USA.  Contact: M. Bjerkness, American
    Phytopath. Society, 3340 Pilot Knob Rd., St. Paul, MN 55121,
    USA.  Mailto:MBjerkness@scisoc.org.  Fax: 1-651-454-0766.
    Phone: 1-651-994-3853.  Web: http://www.apsnet.org/online/sbr/.
---------
03-06 December * 4TH INTERNATIONAL _Bemisia_ WORKSHOP, and INTERNATIONAL
    WHITEFLY GENOMICS WORKSHOP, Duck Key, FL, USA.  Contact: C.
    McKenzie, U.S. Hort. Resch. Lab., 2001 South Rock
    Rd., Fort Pierce, FL 34945, USA.  Phone: 1-772-462-5917.
    Mailto:CMcKenzie@ushrl.ars.usda.gov.  Fax: 1-772-462-5986.
    Web: http://www.conference.ifas.ufl.edu/bemisia/.
---------
05-06 December * 8TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PLANT DISEASES,
    Tours, FRANCE.  Contact: AFPP, 6 Blvd. de la Bastille, 75012
    Paris, FRANCE.  Fax: 33-1-4344-1919.  Mailto:afpp@afpp.net.
    Phone: 33-1-4344-8964.
---------
10-14 December * ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA ANNUAL MEETING,
    Indianapolis, IN, USA.  Contact: ESA, 9301 Annapolis Rd.,
    Lanham, MD 20706-3115, USA.  Fax: 1-301-731-4538.
    Mailto:meet@entsoc.org.  Web: http://www.entsoc.org.
---------
11-14 December * NORTH CENTRAL WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY ANNUAL MEETING,
    Milwaukee, WI, USA.  Contact: R.A. Schmidt, NCWSS,
    1508 West University, Champaign, IL 61821-3133, USA.
    Mailto:raschwssa@aol.com.  Fax: 1-217-352-4241.
    Phone: 1-217-352-4212.  Web: http://www.ncwss.org.

========================= 2007 ============================

20-25 January * SOUTHERN (U.S.) WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY ANNUAL
    MEETING, Nashville, TN, USA.  Contact: R. Schmidt,
    mailto:raschwssa@aol.com.
---------
25-26 January * VEGETATION MANAGEMENT, Warwickshire, UK. * Contact:
    Assn. of Applied Biologists, c/o Warwick HRI, Wellesbourne, Warwick
    CV35 9EF, UK.  Mailto:Carol.aab@warwick.uk.  Fax: 44-0-1789-470234.
    Web: http://www.aab.org.uk.
---------
05-10 February * WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA ANNUAL MEETING,
    San Antonio, TX, USA.  Contact: WSSA, PO Box 1897, Lawrence, KS
    66044-8897, USA.  Fax: 1-785-843-1274.  Phone: 1-785-843-1235.
    Mailto:wssa@allenpress.com.  Web: http://www.wssa.net.
---------
01-03 March * MOLECULAR APPROACHES TO STUDY TROPHIC INTERACTIONS:
    CURRENT PROGRESS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS, Innsbruck, AUSTRIA.
    Contact: Institute of Ecology, Univ. of Innsbruck, Technikerstr.
    25, 6020 Innsbruck, AUSTRIA.  Mailto:mtisymposium@uibk.ac.at.
    Web: http://www.entomologentagung2007.at/symposium.php.
---------
12-14 March * 7TH WORKSHOP, EUROPEAN WEED RESEARCH SOCIETY,
    PHYSICAL AND CULTURAL WEED CONTROL, Waren/Muritz, GERMANY.
    Contact: B. Gerowitt, mailto:Baerbel.Gerowitt@uni-rostock.de.
    Web: http://www.ewrs.org/pwc/upcoming_7th_meeting.htm.
---------
16-18 April * RESISTANCE 2007: AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE,
    Harpenden, Herts., UK.  Contact: Resistance 2007 Conference
    Secretariat, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Herts. AL5 2JQ, UK.
    Mailto:res.2007@bbsrc.ac.uk.  Fax: 44-0-1582-760981.
    Web: http://www.rothamsted.ac.uk/Research/Resistance2007.html.
---------
22-27 April * 12TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF
    WEEDS, Montpellier, FRANCE.  Contact: mailto:weeds2007@ars-ebcl.org.
    Web: http://www.cilba.agropolis.fr/Pages/Frameset-welcome2.htm.
---------
03-07 June * INTERNATIONAL PARASITIC PLANT SOCIETY CONGRESS,
    Charlotsville, VA, USA.  Web: http://www.ppws.vt.edu/IPPS/.
---------
11-15 June * 17EME REUNION ET CONFERENCE SCIENTIFIQUE DE
    L'ASSOCIATION AFRICAINE DES ENTOMOLOGISTES, Dakar, SENEGAL.
    Contact: Sec. Gen, AAIS, K. Diarra, Univ. C.A. Diop de Dakar,
    BP 5005, Dakar-Fann, SENEGAL.  Mailto:Diarra2812@yahoo.fr.
---------
18-21 June * 14TH EUROPEAN WEED RESEARCH SOCIETY SYMPOSIUM, Hamar,
    NORWAY.  Contact: P. Barberi, SSSUP, Piazza Martiri della Liberta
    33, IT-56127 Pisa, ITALY.  Mailto:Barberi@sssup.it.
    Fax: 39-050-883-215.  Phone: 39-050-883-449.
    Web: http://www.ewrs.org.
---------
21-27 July * 8TH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MOLECULAR PLANT-MICROBE
    INTERACTIONS, Sorrento, ITALY.  Contact: http://www.mpmi2007.org.
---------
28 July-01 August * AMERICAN PHYTOPATHOLOGICAL SOCIETY ANNUAL
    MEETING, San Diego, CA, USA.  Contact: APS, 3340 Pilot Knob
    Rd., St. Paul, MN 55121-2097, USA.  Mailto:PTrenda@scisoc.org.
    Fax: 1-612-454-0766.  Phone: 1-651-994-3848.
    Web: http://www.apsnet.org.
---------
29 July-02 August * 13TH SYMPOSIUM ON INSECT-PLANT RELATIONSHIPS,
    Uppsala, SWEDEN.  Contact: Academic Conferences, PO Box 7059,
    SE-750 07 Uppsala, SWEDEN.  Mailto:sip13@slu.se.
    Fax: 46-1867-3530.  Phone: 46-1867-2084.
    Web: http://www-conference.slu.se/sip13/index.htm.
---------
06-09 August * INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON ADJUVANTS FOR
    AGROCHEMICALS, "Adjuvants in Our World," Columbus, OH, USA.
    Contact: J. Hazen, mailto:Jim.Hazen@akzonobel-chemicals.com.
    Web: http://www.isaa-online.org/isaa2007.htm.
---------
05-10 September * INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON THE RESEARCH INTO
    BEHAVIOUR AND ECOLOGY OF APHIDOPHAGOUS INSECTS, "Ecology of
    Aphidophaga 10," Athens, GREECE.  Contact: N.G. Kavallieratos, Lab.
    of Agric. Entomology, Benaki Phytopath. Institute, 8 Stefanou
    Delta, 14561, Kifissia, Attica, GREECE.
    Mailto:Nick_Kaval@hotmail.com.
    Web: http://www.aphidophaga10.com.
---------
10-12 September * CONVERGENCE OF GENOMICS AND THE LAND GRANT
    MISSION: EMERGING TRENDS IN THE APPLICATION OF GENOMICS IN
    AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH, West Lafayette, IN, USA.  Contact:
    S. Yaninek, mailto:Yaninek@purdue.edu.
    Web: http://www.entm.purdue.edu/conference/.
---------
17-21 September * 9TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE ECOLOGY
    AND MANAGEMENT OF ALIEN PLANT INVASIONS, Perth, WA, AUSTRALIA.
    Contact: M. Sheehan, Conf. Secretariat, Congress West Pty. Ltd.,
    12 Thelma St., Suite 3, West Perth, WA 6005, AUSTRALIA.
    Mailto:emapi9@congresswest.com.au.  Fax: 61-8-9322-1734.
    Web: http://www.congresswest.com.au/emapi9/.
    Phone: 61-8-9322-6906.
---------
24-27 September * 16TH BIENNIAL AUSTRALASIAN PLANT PATHOLOGY
    SOCIETY CONFERENCE, "Back to Basics: Managing Plant Disease,"
    Adelaide, SA, AUSTRALIA.  Contact:
    Web: http://www.australasianplantpathologysociety.org.au.
---------
02-06 October * 21ST ASIAN PACIFIC WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY CONFERENCE,
    Colombo, SRI LANKA.  Contact: Conference Secretary, Office of the
    Dean, Fac. of Agric., Univ. of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya, SRI
    LANKA.  Mailto:apwss21@yahoo.com.  Fax: 94-812-388041.
    Phone: 94-812-395100.  Web: http://www.apwss21.lk/.
---------
08-10 October * AGRICULTURAL FIELD TRIALS TODAY AND TOMORROW,
    INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP, Stuttgart, GERMANY.  Contact: H.
    Bleiholder, mailto:H.Bleiholder@t-online.de.
---------
15-18 October * 16TH INTERNATIONAL PLANT PROTECTION CONGRESS,
    Glasgow, UK.  Contact: C. Todd, BCPC, 7 Omni Biz. Ctr., Omega
    Park, Alton, Hampshire GU34 2QD, UK.  Mailto:md@bcpc.org.
    Fax: 44-0-1420-593209.  Phone: 44-0-1420-593200.
    Web: http://www.bcpc.org.
---------
15-19 October * 10TH INTERNATIONAL PLANT VIRUS EPIDEMIOLOGY
    SYMPOSIUM, "Controlling Epidemics of Emerging and Established
    Plant Virus Diseases--the Way Forward," Patancheru, INDIA.
    Contact: P.L. Kumar, ICRISAT, Patancheru 502324, Hyderabad, AP,
    INDIA.  Mailto:secretary@mvbv2006.org.  Fax: 91-40-307-13074.
    Phone: 91-40-307-13380.  Web: http://www.ipve2007.org.
---------
16 October * SCI CONFERENCE, "Crop Protection Technology: The
    Way Forward for Poverty Reduction in Less Developed Countries?,"
    Glasgow, UK.  Contact: L. Copping, phone: 44-0-1799-521369.
    Mailto:LCopping@globalnet.co.uk.  Web: http://tinyurl.com/n899x.
---------
16-20 October * 3RD EUROPEAN WHITEFLY SYMPOSIUM, Almeria, SPAIN.
    Contact: L. Robertson, IWSN/EWSN, John Innes Ctr., Norwich
    Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UH, UK.
    Fax: 44-0-1603-450350.  Phone: 44-0-1603-450296.
    Mailto:events@whitefly.org.  Web: http://www.whitefly.org.
---------
21-26 October * 14TH INTERNATIONAL _Botrytis_ SYMPOSIUM, Cape Town,
    SOUTH AFRICA.  Contact: Conferences et al, PO Box 452, Stellenbosch
    7599, SOUTH AFRICA.  Mailto:Deidre@iafrica.com.
    Fax: 27-21-883-8177. Phone: 27-21-886-4496.
    Web: http://academic.sun.ac.za/botrytis2007/index.htm.
---------
09-13 December * ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA ANNUAL MEETING,
    San Diego, CA, USA.  Contact: ESA, 9301 Annapolis Rd.,
    Lanham, MD 20706-3115, USA.  Fax: 1-301-731-4538.
    Mailto:meet@entsoc.org.  Web: http://www.entsoc.org.

========================= 2008 ============================

10-13 February * INTERNATIONAL PLANT RESISTANCE TO INSECTS
    WORKSHOP, Ft. Collins, CO, USA.  Contact: F. Peairs,
    mailto:Frank.Peairs@colostate.edu.
---------
06-10 May * THIRD EUROPEAN WHITEFLY SYMPOSIUM,
    Almeria, SPAIN.  Contact: L. Robertson, EWSN Office, c/o John
    Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UH, UK.
    Fax: 44-0-1603-450045.  Phone: 44-0-1603-450000.
    Mailto:events@whitefly.org.
    Web: http://www.whitefly.org/EWSIII_2007/EWSIII.asp.
---------
23-26 June * 5TH INTERNATIONAL WEED SCIENCE CONGRESS, Vancouver, BC,
    CANADA. * Contact: A.J. Fischer, IWSS, Weed Science, Plant Sci.
    Dept., Univ. of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
    Mailto:AJFischer@ucdavis.edu.
---------
26-31 July * AMERICAN PHYTOPATHOLOGICAL SOCIETY ANNUAL MEETING,
    Minneapolis, MN, USA.  Contact: APS, 3340 Pilot Knob Rd.,
    St. Paul, MN 55121-2097, USA.  Mailto:PTrenda@scisoc.org.
    Fax: 1-612-454-0766.  Phone: 1-651-994-3848.
    Web: http://www.apsnet.org.
---------
24-29 August * 9TH CONGRESS, INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR PLANT
    PATHOLOGY, Torino, ITALY.  Contact: ACTA, Via Caboto, 44,
    10129 Torino, ITALY.  Mailto:info@icpp2008.org.
    Fax: 39-011-590833.  Phone: 39-011-591871.
---------
07-11 December * ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA ANNUAL MEETING,
    Charlotte, NC, USA.  Contact: ESA, 9301 Annapolis Rd.,
    Lanham, MD 20706-3115, USA.  Fax: 1-301-731-4538.
    Mailto:meet@entsoc.org.  Web: http://www.entsoc.org.

========================= 2009 ============================

08-13 February * 3RD INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON BIOLOGICAL CONTROL
    OF ARTHROPODS, "Maximizing Success while Minimizing Risk,"
    Canterbury, NEW ZEALAND.  Contact: H. Shrewsbury, Prof. Devel.
    Group, PO Box 84, Lincoln Univ., Canterbury, NEW ZEALAND.
    Web: http://www.isbca09.com.
---------
30 July-06 August * AMERICAN PHYTOPATHOLOGICAL SOCIETY ANNUAL
    MEETING, Portland, OR, USA.  Contact: APS, 3340 Pilot Knob
    Rd., St. Paul, MN 55121-2097, USA.  Mailto:PTrenda@scisoc.org.
    Phone: 1-651-994-3848.  Fax: 1-612-454-0766.
    Web: http://www.apsnet.org.
---------
13-17 December * ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA ANNUAL MEETING,
    Indianapolis, IN, USA.  Contact: ESA, 9301 Annapolis Rd.,
    Lanham, MD 20706-3115, USA.  Fax: 1-301-731-4538.
    Mailto:meet@entsoc.org.  Web: http://www.entsoc.org.

==========================  2010 ==========================

26-30 July * AMERICAN PHYTOPATHOLOGICAL SOCIETY ANNUAL MEETING,
    Nashville, TN, USA.  Contact: APS, 3340 Pilot Knob Rd., St.
    Paul, MN 55121-2097, USA.  Mailto:PTrenda@scisoc.org.
    Phone: 1-651-994-3848.  Fax: 1-651-454-0766.
    Web: http://www.apsnet.org.
---------
12-16 December * ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA ANNUAL MEETING
    San Diego, CA, USA.  Contact: ESA, 9301 Annapolis Rd.,
    Lanham, MD 20706-3115, USA.  Fax: 1-301-731-4538.
    Mailto:meet@entsoc.org.  Web: http://www.entsoc.org.


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