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INTEGRATED PLANT PROTECTION CENTER

IPMnet NEWS


March 2011, Issue no. 185
ISSN: 1523-7893 Copyright 2005


Quick Nav: News | Medley | Research/Papers | Centers | U.S. Aid | Calendar |  
 

IPM NEWS --- international IPM news and programs

 

I. News About IPM


FAO LAUNCHES NEW IPM EFFORT IN ASIA

    A newly launched initiative will assist Asian countries to develop more effective
strategies to limit the spread, and implement biological control, of Phenacoccus manihoti
(cassava pink mealybug), FAO's decade old vegetable IPM programme in South &
Southeast Asia announced recently.

    In the area of the Greater Mekong Subregion and nearby nations Manihot esculenta
(cassava) is a major crop used for human consumption and bioenergy production, and
is grown by approximately 3 million small plot farmers. P. manihoti has become a
major pest problem for this crop with some areas suffering large zones of devastation.

    The new technical cooperation project "Capacity Building for Spread Prevention
and Management of Cassava Pink Mealybug in the Greater Mekong Subregion" will
include "assistance for farmer training programs to promote biocontrol and IPM among
smallholder farmers." Specific activities will be research and technical support aimed
at developing better understanding, and more effective management, of P. manihoti.

In addition, nations in the region that are currently free of the pest will be aided in
mass rearing the mealybug parasite Anagyrus lopezi as a key biocontrol agent. Re-
sources will also be directed toward precautionary measures to prevent, or delay,
entry of mealybug into presently unaffected areas. Another major thrust will involve
building the capacity of extensionists to conduct farmer field schools and to help
growers more effectively recognize and manage the pest when it is present. 
-> FAO Inter Country Programme for IPM in Vegetables, FAO-RAP, No. 39
Maliwan Mansion, Phra Athit Rd., Bangkok 10200, THAILAND. 
vegetable-ipm@fao.org.  Fax: 66-2-697-4422.  Voice: 66-2-697-4000, ext. 4314.  www.vegetableipmasia.org.
    --excerpted, with thanks, from the FAO-RAP website.   

U.S. STATES ADOPT 'NO DRIFT' WEB DATABASE

   A straight forward communication link has been devised to help avoid pesticide
spray drift problems in unintended areas by connecting midwestern U.S. growers of
pesticide-sensitive, or organic, crops with the contractors and companies that apply
crop protection materials to nearby fields.

    The web-based program, Driftwatch, encourages growers of pesticide averse crops,
or organic crops, to register the locations of their fields in a database maintained by a
central agency. Applicators are also urged to register, and to then check the website's
database for listed areas before beginning spraying. Registered applicators also receive
email messages alerting them to new drift-sensitive fields that may be recently added
to the database.

    Success of the Driftwatch program depends on growers taking the time to register and
list the location of their fields and applicators being sure to register and check the website
and carefully note the no-drift locations before beginning spray operations. Growers with
registered sensitive fields can order and post highly visible "no-drift zone" signs.

    Driftwarch, also used to protect sensitive habitats , was originally devised at Purdue
University for use in the state of Indiana, but has now been adopted, or is being consid-
ered for adoption, by at least five other midwestern states.  -> www.driftwatch.org

SPECIE LIMITS FOR THE STERILE INSECT TECHNIQUE

    N ot all pest species are viable candidates for management through the sterile insect
technique (SIT) notes J. Hendrichs, Head, Insect Pest Control Section (subprogramme)
of the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture.

    In an introduction to the January 2011 Insect Pest Control Newsletter, no. 76, Dr.
Hendrichs notes that requests for support of SIT programs of  some pest species "are
technically not justifiable as the biology of the target pests renders them not amenable
to SIT development (such as species which are difficult to rear or to manage) or SIT
application (where the released stage is a pest or nuisance. Recent examples in this
category are desert locust, ticks and other blood-feeding arthropods.”

    Even those requests that may be technically justifiable but address pests of only local
or subregional importance are denied as the long-term investment in SIT research and
development is not warranted, he said.

    "The subprogramme," Hendrichs explained, "continues to give priority to international
and regional pest problems, or very important pest species with the potential of becoming
major international invasive species, without neglecting at the same time our principles
that the SIT should only be integrated where it has a comparative advantage and where
there are no other effective methods to deal with the problem."

-> J. Hendrichs, Insect Pest Control Section, FAO/IAEA, PO Box 100, 1400 Vienna,
AUSTRIA.  Fax: 43-1-26007.  Voice: 43-1-2600, ext. 21628.  J.Hendrichs@iaea.org.
    --excerpted, with thanks, from INSECT PEST CONTROL NEWSLETTER, no. 76 ;
       thanks also to J. Hendrichs for information.      [#]

A GLOBAL AGRICULTURAL PERSPECTIVE

    C ontemporary agriculture is becoming inextricably linked to IPM. Thus, IPMnet
NEWS
draws reader attention to a highly relevant special report in The Economist
magazine,"The 9 Billion-people Question," focusing on the monumental challenges
facing global food crops agriculture over the next several decades.

    Feeding the world's population, notes the extensively researched report, means
boosting yields, addressing water shortages, adjusting to climatic shifts, and taking
other important actions. In a companion article in the same issue, "Crisis Prevention,"
the anonymous author forcefully argues that governments need to provide more, not
less, support "by reversing the decline in public spending on agricultural research"
instead of complacently cutting back "on the work done in universities and interna-
tional institutions," actions labeled a "huge mistake." Agricultural research, notes
the article, "helps the whole world--and is a bargain."

    Despite the hurdles, "the world is at the start of a new agricultural revolution that
could, for the first time ever, feed all mankind adequately," proclaims the report.
Funds directed to research are seen as returning benefits many times greater than
their cost in terms of people fed and food riots forestalled. IPM, while not mentioned
specifically, has a key role to play in protecting critically important crops and con-
tributing to expanding food crop production.
   --excerpted, with thanks, from The Economist, vol. 398, no. 8722, 26 February
      2011; economist.com/rights (for reprints {$}).



IPM GLOBAL NOTES

*   Experimental results suggest biocontrol of an invasive woody plant caused
less depletion of soil nutrient storage than use of herbicides.  -> M.R. Martin, Melissa.R.Martin@usace.army.mil.

* The stem-mining weevil, Mecinus janthinus Germar, has reduced density and
distribution of Linaria dalmatica (L) Mill. (Dalmatian toadflax) in a large portion
of its range in British Columbia, CANADA.  -> B.H. Van Hezewijk,
Brian.Vanhezewijk@agr.gc.ca.

* A warning system based on a combination of a model, short-term weather fore-
casts, and a phone messaging network reduced fungicide application against grape-
vine downy mildew by up to two-thirds and produced significant economic gains
when compared to application on a conventional schedule. 
-> T. Caffi, Tito.Caffi@unicatt.it.

* Results from an extensive 15-year study show a lengthening Ambrosia spp.
(ragweed) pollen season in higher-latitude sites across North America related to
climate change dynamics .  -> L.H. Ziska, L.Ziska@ars.usda.gov.

                                                                     
II. IPM Information Resources
       > Recently Published Information
       > Other Published Materials


RECENTLY PUBLISHED INFORMATION

        IPMnet NEWS welcomes information about websites, publications, CD/DVDs, or
videos focused on, or related to, crop IPM, crop protection, or invasive species. Please send
a review copy of the material to the postal address at end of this file; or, send the URL to:
IPMnet@science.oregonstate.edu.   A {$} symbol indicates an item can be purchased, or
that there may be charges for handling, postage, or both.

ILLUSTRATED PESTS OF CAMBODIA PAPERS PUBLISHED

    The Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) recently
published two extensively illustrated and detailed monographs, both of which can
be freely downloaded. They are:

    Insects of Upland Crops in Cambodia , by P. Chanthy, et al, serves as a field guide
    for identifying insects and spiders in the upland cropping systems of Cambodia and
    includes an important section on beneficial species. Monograph #143, 132 pages,
    2010, with close-up color photos, descriptions, crops attacked, damage caused,
    and 'when to look' for presence. www.aciar.gov.au/node/12904.

    Weeds of Upland Crops in Cambodia , by R. Martin and P. Chanthy, was first
    published by the New South Wales government, then republished in 2009 as
    ACIAR monograph 141, an 81-page identification guide for farmers and
    extension personnel in Cambodia's upland cropping region. Contents include
    nomenclature in both English and Khmer along with dozens of full color photos
    and botanical descriptions. There is also an all Khmer version available.
    www.aciar.gov.au/publication/mn141.

ACIAR, GPO Box 1571, Canberra, ACT 2601, AUSTRALIA.
Voice: 61-2-6217-0500.  aciar@aciar.gov.au.
        --excerpted, with thanks, from ACIAR resources.

NEW AGRICULTURAL THESAURUS ANNOUNCED

    The U.S. Dept. of Agriculture's National Agricultural Library has published an
extensively revised and expanded 2011edition of the NAL Agricultural Thesaurus
and Glossary
(NALT) containing well over 80,000 terms including 3,441 new
terms and 321 definitions. Terminology in the 2011 version has been especially
increased in areas associated with nanotechnology, food safety risk assessment,
and sustainable agriculture. NALT, while primarily devised for library purposes
(indexing, retrieval), is also a useful resource for students as well as writers seeking
precise definitions. Included definitions have been drawn from authoritative sources,
then painstakingly reviewed to assure accuracy. The 2011 version is the 10th annual
edition and is cooperatively produced in English and Spanish (in cooperation with
the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation in Agriculture). It is freely available
online at http://agclass.nal.usda.gov.
    --excerpted, with thanks, from U.S. Dept. of Agriculture sources.  

WEED MANAGEMENT TRIALS DATABASE

    The Canadian Weed Science Society (CWSS) has established, and maintains,
a public database of weed management trials http://tinyurl.com/4shxghm. Each
entry lists the trial name, the year reported, the crop, the lead research scientist,
keywords, and the interactive trial file name. To add content to the database indi-
viduals need to register and then log in.  -> M. Cowbrough,
Mike.Cowbrough@ontario.ca.
    --excerpted, with thanks, from CWSS materials.  

NEW INFORMATION TOOLS

    The U.S. Center for Plant Health Science and Technology (CPHST) latest identifi-
cation tools are: "A Resource for Pests and Diseases of Cultivated Palms: Identifying
Commonly Cultivated Palms
," by P. Anderson, and "A Resource for Wood Boring
Beetles of the World: Bark Beetle Genera of the United States
," by J. Mercado.
-> T.W. Walters, Coordinator, USDA-APHIS-CPHST, 2301 Research Blvd., Suite
108, Fort Collins, CO 80526-1825, USA.   Terrence.W.Walters@aphis.usda.gov.
Fax: 1-970-482-0924.  Voice: 1-970-490-4471.
    --thanks to T.W. Walters for information. 

ENTOMOLOGY IN SOUTHWESTERN U.S.

    Formed in 1976 with a regional focus, the Society of Southwestern Entomologists
(SWSE) aims to "foster entomological accomplishments in the southwestern U.S.
and Mexico," according to its website http://sswe.tamu.edu. It not only publishes the
refereed quarterly journal, SOUTHWESTERN ENTOMOLOGIST , but encourages
"association and free discussion among all entomologists," as well as "dissemination
of information to the public." Membership is open to anyone interested in, or involved
with, entomology. Beyond members, subscriptions to the journal are available to both
individuals and institutions. The journal, in addition to quarterly issues, occasionally
publishes full-length supplements.   {$}   -> A. Knutson, TCE, 17360 Coit Rd., Dallas,
TX 75252-6599, USA.   A-Knutson@tamu.edu.  Fax: 1-972-952-9632.
Voice: 1-972-952-9222.
    --excerpted, with thanks, from the indicated website.


OTHER PUBLISHED MATERIALS

* Crop protection related U.S. Agricultural Research Service articles appearing in
recent issues of the journal Agricultural Research, at www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/,
in either html or pdf format, include:

"Rooting Out Rootworm Resistance," September 2010;
"Sweet Corn Weed-management Systems for the Changing Climate," September 2010;
"Pest-free Christmas Trees," November/December 2010;
"Predators can be a Farmer's Best Friend," November/December 2010;
"Forum: Innovative Ways to Fight Insect Pests," January 2011;
"New Hopes for Combating Hopping Pests," January 2011;
"'Fire Gel Protects Beneficial Nematodes from Sun," February 2011.
    --excerpted, with thanks, from the USDA-ARS website.

                                                                  
III. IPM Medley
        > Equipment, Products, Processes, Services
        > Professional Opportunities
        > Sorting Through the "In" Box


EQUIPMENT, PRODUCTS, PROCESSES, SERVICES
____________________________________
Selecting Gloves for Working with Pesticides

    Personal protection equipment (PPE) is a vitally important element in pesticide
application and gloves are a key component for achieving effective protection from
dermal exposure. One of the most complete discussions of gloves, the various types,
materials, and construction available, is the 2009, 5-page paper Glove Selection for
Working with Pesticides
, by F.M. Fishel. Following an introduction regarding
human exposure to pesticides, Dr. Fishel explains the role of pesticide label speci-
fications for PPE and then presents information about glove design, material, sizing,
and glove liners, and includes a table of chemical resistance categories. The succinct,
illustrated document is PI-120/157, published by the Pesticide Information Office
at the Univ. of Florida (USA). A web version http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi157 can
be freely downloaded as can a PDF version.
    --excerpted, with thanks, from the indicated website.   

______________________________
Baculovirus Targets Two Pest Insects

    A Swiss firm recently announced development of a Baculovirus product for the
combined control of Cydia pomonella (codling moth) and Grapholita molesta (oriental
fruit fly moth). The new virus strain is said to provide control in both pome fruit and
stone fruit. To date the new isolate has been successfully field tested in Europe
against the two key lepidopteran pest species, with field trials currently under way
in the southern hemisphere. The new product is claimed to offer "highly specific
and residue-free insect control, thus providing an IPM-friendly resistance manage-
ment tool," according to the firm's website. Registration is in process and product
launch is expected sometime during 2012-2014. The firm currently offers a range
of other biocontrol products including beneficial species, monitoring systems, and
traps.  -> Andermatt Biocontrols, Stahlermatten 6, CH-6146, SWITZERLAND.
Fax: 41-62-917-5006.  Voice: 41-62-917-5006.  sales@biocontrol.ch.
www.biocontrol.ch.
        --excerpted, with thanks, from the indicated website.

____________________
On-line Courses Offered

    A U.S. media company website contains more than 20 continuing education courses
with accreditation by a variety of organizations. Many of the courses, which are avail-
able at any time, are sponsored by commercial entities. Among the offerings related to
crop protection are: "Insect Resistance Management in Agronomic and Row Crops,"
and "Managing Spray Drift." The courses, some free, others fee-based (US$50), are all
said to be prepared by experts. Registration is required and can be launched from the
website www.pentonag.com/index.php.
    --excerpted, with thanks, from the indicated website.


PROFESSIONAL OPPORTUNITIES
___________________________
A gricultural Officer - Plant Pathology, (P4), Rome, ITALY * Identify priorities to mitigate
                                                                                                        food security threats caused by
transboundary plant diseases; cooperate with FAO units and other partners to raise funds
to support emergency prevention programs; prepare project documents and help with
coordinating and backstopping field projects; participate in preparing relevant reports. 
* REQUIRES: Advanced degree (university) in plant pathology; 5-years of experience in
transboundary plant-disease management in developing countries; working knowledge of
English, French, or Spanish and limited knowledge of one of the other two; ability to work
under pressure and to travel frequently; demonstrated ability to work with, coordinate,
and motivate multidisciplinary teams; ability to interpret and analyze field information;
demonstrated advisory skill; excellent oral and written communications skills (ability
to prepare concise reports); computer and word processing competence. Position: V.A.
2281-AGP. NOTES: applications by women will be welcomed; with equal qualifications
candidates from one of the FAO un-represented or under-represented countries (see
http://www.fao.org/employment/empl-home/non-under-rep/en/ ) will be preferred.
* CONTACT: send CV by email to: C. Pantenius, Senior Officer, Food and Agriculture
Organization of the United Nations, Rome, ITALY. Christian.Pantenius@fao.org.
_________________________________
Pesticide Safety Education Coordinator-IPM, D avis, CA, USA *
Develop and deliver pestticide safety programs for end-users in California; interact with federal, state, and county personnel to ensure safe, legal, and effective pesticide use; assist users with educational needs related to pesticide pre-license and recertification; support others who conduct pesticide safety training; ensure sound decision making in the context of IPM; reduce pesticide risks to human health and the environment. * REQUIRES: MS (minimum) in a discipline related to pest management; strong background experience in application technology, chemical trans port, water quality, and toxicology.  Postion AP #11-01.  Http://tinyurl.com/63wsa9x.
*CONTACT: Academic Recruiter, ANR Academic Personnel, DANR Bldg., Hopkins
Rd., One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616, USA.  anracademicsearch@ucop.edu.
Fax: 1-530-752-7785.

SORTING THROUGH THE 'IN' BOX

-The Nigeria-based Systemwide IPM program has published SP-IPM
Technical Innovation Brief #10
, " Enhanced Protection for Tissue Cultured Banana ,"
a 2-page discussion on the use of endophytes for protection of this crop. Authors
T. Dubois, et al, include several color photos. The Brief can be freely downloaded
at http://tinyurl.com/5syoooe.  -> SP-IPM Secretariat, PMB 5320, Ibadan,
NIGERIA.

-Entomologist L. Valencia in PERU publishes Artropodos & Plantas , an illustrated
Spanish language "guia de fitofagos" at www.guiadefitofagos.com.

-
Recently published issues by multi-national periodicals:
                IOBC Newsletter 88, December 2010; www.IOBC-Global.org.
                Fruit Fly News #18, February 2011; http://tinyurl.com/68p2jo4.
               What's New in Biological Control of Weeds, #54, November 2010;
                            http://tinyurl.com/y9xn24s.
                Haustorium #58, December 2010; www.parasiticplants.org.

-QUOTE:   “Since 1996, biotech crop adoption has contributed to reducing the
release of greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture, decreased pesticide spraying,
significantly boosted farmers’ incomes and resulted in lower real world prices for corn,
canola, soybeans and the main derivatives of these crops.”
           G. Brookes, Director
           PG Economics, UK


IV. IPM -Related Publications > Books, Other Longer Publications

IPMnet NEWS will gladly mention publica with material on rodent outbreaks in non-Asian areas and the generalities that can be drawn between the two settings. The 2010, 297-page work includes numerous color photos. A concluding appendix by Dr. Singleton presents a brief, but liberally illustrated treatise, "Recipes for Rodent Culinary Delights," depicting preparation of rodent-based specialties but excluding ratatouille. See: http://tinyurl.com/26dxdwb . -> IRRI, Publications, DAPO Box 7777, Metro Manila, PHILIPPINES. irri@cgiar.org. --excerpted, with thanks, from the indicated publication and IRRI website. [#] AGRICULTURE, GM CROPS AND THE ENVIRONMENT A 2009 monograph takes a broad, most-sides-considered, view of genetically modified (GM) crops impact on the environment by addressing the major concerns of scientists, environmental groups, policy makers, and the general public. Notably absent in the impressive list of experts who contributed chapters to the Environment- al Impact of Genetically Modified Crops are those of growers or agribusiness repre- sentatives. Editors N. Ferry and A.M.R. Gatehouse, both on faculty at Newcastle Univ. in the UK, have deftly assembled a mass of information focused on the risks, benefits, and potential ecological impact of GM crops as known so far, including a chapter reporting on instances of pest insects developing partial resistance to certain GM crops. The hardbound, 439-page volume offers a useful contribution to the ex- panding body of literature by documenting environmental impact concerns with GM crop production. The editors conclude that, "agriculture is an inherently unnatural situation and once this is fully understood by the broader community, we may be able to advance towards a rational debate on the role of biotechnology in food production." {$} -> CABI, Nosworthy Way, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 8DE, UK. cabi@cabi.org. Fax: 44-0-1491-833508. Voice: 44-0-1491-832111. www.cabi.org --excerpted, with thanks, from the cited publication. IPM FOR CHRISTMAS TREES The U.S. state of Pennsylvania's IPM program published Integrated Pest Man- agement for Christmas Tree Production in late 2010 describing pests commonly associated with tree species utilized during winter holidays. This comprehensive, highly informative and graphically pleasing 208-page manual, coordinated by C.E. Thomas and S. Pickel, is bursting with more than 400 full color photos. The text outlines suggested management procedures with, of course, emphasis on IPM and offers a discussion of key IPM basics, pest fact sheets, pesticides information, scouting report templates, and a glossary, among other items. While the subtitle is " A Guide for Pennsylvania Growers ," the information can be readily extrapolated to varying degrees to other regions and even other crops. The material represents input from numerous experts and was reviewed by both growers and researchers. For a free PDF copy of the publication see http://extension.psu.edu/ipm/program/christmas-tree. The hard, spiral bound, lay-flat version printed on high quality paperstock has a water- proof cover and is designed for in-field usage. Hard copies of document AGRS-117 can be ordered {$}using the form at http://tinyurl.com /65qdpve, or by email to AgPubsDist@psu.edu.    --excerpted, with thanks, from PA IPM News, Winter 2011; thanks also to C .E. Thomas and K. Auman-Bauer for information.
                                                                     
"Assessing the Impact of Farmer Field School Participation on IPM Adoption in
     Uganda," Erbaugh, J.M., et al. *  JRNL. OF INTL. AGRIC. AND EXTEN.
     EDU., 17(3), 5-17, Fall 2010.

“Protecting Container-grown Plants,” Parke, J.L., and C. Lewis. * DIGGER, 55(2),
     42-45, February 2011.
                                                               
VI.  U.S. AID's IPM-Collaborative Research Support Program
        (IPM-CRSP)

Special Events Planned for Joint Meeting

    The IPM CRSP is organizing several symposia to be held in conjunction with the
American Phytopathological Society--International Association of Plant Protection
Societies joint meeting during 06-10 August 2011, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.

    The special seminars planned so far include:
1. "Better use of entomopathogenic microbes in IPM;"
2. "IPM program for vegetable crops in the tropics;" and
3. "Management of insect-transmitted plant virus diseases in the tropics."
An additional seminar under development is "Role of IPM in the 'Feed the Future
Initiative' of the USAID."

    Online submission of oral technical and poster presentation abstracts is open
01 February to 15 March 15, 2011. The contact point for special programs is
http://www.apsnet.org/meetings/annual/program/Pages/SpecialSessions.aspx.
->R. (Muni) Muniappan, Program Director, IPM CRSP,Virginia Tech, 526 Prices
Fork Rd., Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.  RMuni@vt.edu.  Voice: 1-540-231-3516.
www.oired.vt.edu/ipmcrsp.
                                                               
VII. IPMnet CALENDAR--Update
        > (N)ew or [R]evised Entries for the IPMnet CALENDAR

NOTES:

1. The IPMnet CALENDAR -- Update , lists only:
       --(N)ew events not previously cited in IPMnet NEWS ; and,
       --[R]evised events with new information compared to previous
mention in IPMnet NEWS .

2. The IPMnet CALENDAR, Latest Complete Version , can be requested
        any time from IPMnet@science.oregonstate.edu. It is also online at
www.pestinfo.org/calendar.php3 courtesy of International Society for Pest
Information (ISPI) executive director, B. Zelazny . The latter site includes
features designed for user convenience. The IPMnet CALENDAR--Update
section appears in each IPMnet NEWS issue.

3. Please send information about future events, or revisions, to: IPMnet NEWS ,
        at IPMnet@science.oregonstate.edu. Information listed in the I PMnet
CALENDAR--Update was supplied by, and collected from, various sources;
IPMnet greatly appreciates all cooperation. Note: websites listed herein are
current as of publication of this issue of IPMnet NEWS but may be subject
to change.

(N)ewly Listed, or [R]evised Entries: as of 01 March 2011

2011

(N) 28-30 March * WESTERN (U.S.) AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT
        SOCIETY 30th ANNUAL MEETING
, Denver, CO, USA.
        Info: http://wapms.org/wapms_conference.htm.

(N) 14 April * WEED SOCIETY OF VICTORIA, SEMINAR AND ANNUAL
        GENERAL MEETING
, Attwood, VIC, AUSTRALIA.  Info: M. Hansford,
        Michael.Hansford@dpi.vic.gov.auHttp://tinyurl.com/67txg4q.

(N) 19-21 May * 2nd INTERNATIONAL PHYTOPLASMOLOGIST WORKING
        GROUP MEETING
, Neustadt an der Weinstrasse, GERMANY.  Info:
        www.ppphe.phytomedizin.org.

(N) 06-08 July * NETS2011, “Tomorrow’s Pests Today,” Auckland, NEW
        ZEALAND.  Info: W. Mead, Wendy.Mead@ew.govt.nz.
        Http://biosecurity.org.nz/nets/next-nets/.

(N) 18-21 July * 12th SIMPOSIO DE CONTROLE BIOLOGICO (SICONBIOL
        2011),
Anhembi, SP, BRAZIL.  Info: www.eventus.com.br/siconbiol2011.
        siconbiol@eventus.com.br.

(N) 18-21 July * LATIN AMERICAN MYCOLOGICAL CONGRESS, San Jose,
        COSTA RICA.  Info: C. Rojas, web@almic.orgwww.almic.org.

(N) 25-26 August * 3rd INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC SEMINAR OF PLANT
        PATHOLOGY
, Trujillo, PERU.  Info: J. Chico-Ruiz, JChico22@gmail.com.
        www.facbio.unitru.edu.pe.

(N) 07-09 September * 11th INTERNATIONAL HCH AND PESTICIDES
        FORUM
, Gabala, AZERBAIJAN.  Info: www.hchforum.com.

(N) 18-22 September * INTEGRATED CONTROL IN PROTECTED CROPS,
        TEMPERATE CLIMATE
, Winchester, Hampshire, UK.  Info: C. Millman,
        AAB, Carol@aab.org.  Voice: 44-0-1789-472020.

(N) 02-07 October * 3rd INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON WEEDS AND
        INVASIVE PLANTS
, Ascona, SWITZERLAND.
        Info: http://invasive.weeds.ascona.ewrs.org.

(N) 02-05 October * 6th INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON MOLECULAR
        INSECT SCIENCE
, Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS.  Info:
        www.molecularinsectscience.com.

(N) 30 October-04 November * BENEFITS AND RISKS OF EXOTIC BIOLOGI-
        CAL CONTROL AGENTS
, Hluboka, CZECH REPUBLIC.  Info: P.
        Kindlmann, Na Sadkach 7, CZ-37005, Ceske Budejovice, CZECH REPULIC.
        Pavel.Kindlmann@centrum.cz.  Voice: 420-387- 75636.

(N) 03-04 November * INTERNATIONAL PYRETHRUM SYMPOSIUM,
        Launceston, Tas, AUSTRALIA.  Info: B. Chung, py2011@pyrethrum.com.au.
        www.botanicalra.com.au.

(N) 21-24 November * 2nd WORLD CONFERENCE ON BIOLOGICAL
        INVASIONS and ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONING
, Mar del Plata,
        ARGENTINA.   Info: J.L. Gutiérrez, GriETA, Cevantes Saavedra 1875,
        7600 Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA.  biolief@grieta.org.ar.
        www.grieta.org.ar/biolief/.

(N) 22-24 November * CANADIAN WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY ANNUAL
        MEETING
, Niagara Falls, ONT, CANADA.  Info: www.weedscience.ca.

(N) 12-15 December * NORTH CENTRAL WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY
        ANNUAL MEETING
, Milwaukee, WI, USA.  Info: www.ncwss.org.

2012

(N) 26-30 June * BIOCONTROL OF PLANT PATHOGENS IN SUSTAIN-
        ABLE AGRICULTURE
, Reims, FRANCE.  Info: I. Pertot,
        Ilaria.Pertot@iasma.it.

(N) 03-06 July * 2nd INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM–TEPHRITID
        WORKERS OF EUROPE, AFRICA, AND THE MIDDLE EAST
,
        Kolymbari, Crete, GREECE.  Info: N. Papadopoulos, NPapadop@uth.gr.
        www.diptera.info/news.php.

2013

(N) 10-14 August * AMERICAN PHYTOPATHOLOGICAL SOCIETY
        ANNUAL MEETING
, Providence, RI, USA.  Info: APS, 3340 Pilot
        Knob Rd., St. Paul, MN 55121, USA.  BFord@scisoc.org.
        Fax: 1-651-454-0755.  Voice: 1-651-454-3848.   www.apsnet.org.

2014 and 2015

No (N)ew or [R]evised listings to report for these years.

*********************************************

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